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Comparison of Lactobacillus crispatus isolates from Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiomes with isolates from microbiomes containing bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria.
Microbiology (Reading). 2016 Mar; 162(3):466-475.M

Abstract

Vaginal lactobacilli can inhibit colonization by and growth of other bacteria, thereby preventing development of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Amongst the lactobacilli, Lactobacillus crispatus appears to be particularly effective at inhibiting growth of BV-associated bacteria. Nonetheless, some women who are colonized with this species can still develop clinical BV. Therefore, we sought to determine whether strains of L. crispatus that colonize women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes are distinct from strains that colonize women who develop BV. The genomes of L. crispatus isolates from four women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes (<1% 16S rRNA reads above threshold from genera other than Lactobacillus) and four women with microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria (>12% 16S rRNA reads from bacterial taxa associated with BV) were sequenced and compared. Lactic acid production by the different strains was quantified. Phage induction in the strains was also analysed. There was considerable genetic diversity between strains, and several genes were exclusive to either the strains from Lactobacillus-dominated microbiomes or those containing BV-associated bacteria. Overall, strains from microbiomes dominated by lactobacilli did not differ from strains from microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria with respect to lactic acid production. All of the strains contained multiple phage, but there was no clear distinction between the presence or absence of BV-associated bacteria with respect to phage-induced lysis. Genes found to be exclusive to the Lactobacillus-dominated versus BV-associated bacteria-containing microbiomes could play a role in the maintenance of vaginal health and the development of BV, respectively.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.Center for the Study of Biological Complexity, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA.Center for the Study of Biological Complexity, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA.Center for the Study of Biological Complexity, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA.Center for the Study of Biological Complexity, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA.Center for the Study of Biological Complexity, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. Center for the Study of Biological Complexity, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26747455

Citation

Abdelmaksoud, Abdallah A., et al. "Comparison of Lactobacillus Crispatus Isolates From Lactobacillus-dominated Vaginal Microbiomes With Isolates From Microbiomes Containing Bacterial Vaginosis-associated Bacteria." Microbiology (Reading, England), vol. 162, no. 3, 2016, pp. 466-475.
Abdelmaksoud AA, Koparde VN, Sheth NU, et al. Comparison of Lactobacillus crispatus isolates from Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiomes with isolates from microbiomes containing bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. Microbiology (Reading). 2016;162(3):466-475.
Abdelmaksoud, A. A., Koparde, V. N., Sheth, N. U., Serrano, M. G., Glascock, A. L., Fettweis, J. M., Strauss, J. F., Buck, G. A., & Jefferson, K. K. (2016). Comparison of Lactobacillus crispatus isolates from Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiomes with isolates from microbiomes containing bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. Microbiology (Reading, England), 162(3), 466-475. https://doi.org/10.1099/mic.0.000238
Abdelmaksoud AA, et al. Comparison of Lactobacillus Crispatus Isolates From Lactobacillus-dominated Vaginal Microbiomes With Isolates From Microbiomes Containing Bacterial Vaginosis-associated Bacteria. Microbiology (Reading). 2016;162(3):466-475. PubMed PMID: 26747455.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of Lactobacillus crispatus isolates from Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiomes with isolates from microbiomes containing bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. AU - Abdelmaksoud,Abdallah A, AU - Koparde,Vishal N, AU - Sheth,Nihar U, AU - Serrano,Myrna G, AU - Glascock,Abigail L, AU - Fettweis,Jennifer M, AU - Strauss,Jerome F, AU - Buck,Gregory A, AU - Jefferson,Kimberly K, Y1 - 2016/01/08/ PY - 2016/1/10/entrez PY - 2016/1/10/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline SP - 466 EP - 475 JF - Microbiology (Reading, England) JO - Microbiology (Reading) VL - 162 IS - 3 N2 - Vaginal lactobacilli can inhibit colonization by and growth of other bacteria, thereby preventing development of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Amongst the lactobacilli, Lactobacillus crispatus appears to be particularly effective at inhibiting growth of BV-associated bacteria. Nonetheless, some women who are colonized with this species can still develop clinical BV. Therefore, we sought to determine whether strains of L. crispatus that colonize women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes are distinct from strains that colonize women who develop BV. The genomes of L. crispatus isolates from four women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes (<1% 16S rRNA reads above threshold from genera other than Lactobacillus) and four women with microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria (>12% 16S rRNA reads from bacterial taxa associated with BV) were sequenced and compared. Lactic acid production by the different strains was quantified. Phage induction in the strains was also analysed. There was considerable genetic diversity between strains, and several genes were exclusive to either the strains from Lactobacillus-dominated microbiomes or those containing BV-associated bacteria. Overall, strains from microbiomes dominated by lactobacilli did not differ from strains from microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria with respect to lactic acid production. All of the strains contained multiple phage, but there was no clear distinction between the presence or absence of BV-associated bacteria with respect to phage-induced lysis. Genes found to be exclusive to the Lactobacillus-dominated versus BV-associated bacteria-containing microbiomes could play a role in the maintenance of vaginal health and the development of BV, respectively. SN - 1465-2080 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26747455/Comparison_of_Lactobacillus_crispatus_isolates_from_Lactobacillus_dominated_vaginal_microbiomes_with_isolates_from_microbiomes_containing_bacterial_vaginosis_associated_bacteria_ L2 - http://mic.microbiologyresearch.org/pubmed/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000238 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -