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Does activity affect the outcome of the Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement?
Knee. 2016 Mar; 23(2):327-30.KNEE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

High levels of activity are considered to be a contraindication to unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) and are not recommended after UKR. To determine if these recommendations should apply to the mobile-bearing Oxford UKR, this study assessed the effect of post-operative activity level on the outcome of this device.

METHODS

The outcome of the first 1000 Phase 3 cemented Oxford UKRs implanted between 1998 and 2010 was assessed using survival analysis, the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and the American Knee Society Objective (KSS-O) and Functional (KSS-F) Scores. Patients were grouped according to the maximum post-operative Tegner Activity Score.

RESULTS

The mean follow-up was 6.1 years (range 1 to 14). Overall, increasing activity was associated with superior survival (p=0.025). In the high activity group, with Tegner≥5 (n=115) 2.6% were revised and the 12-year survival was 97.3% (confidence interval (CI): 92.0% to 99.1%). In the low activity group, with Tegner≤4, (n=885) 4.3% were revised and the 12-year survival was 94.0% (CI: 91.4 to 95.8). The difference between the two groups was not significant (p=0.44). Although the final OKS and KSS-F were significantly better in the high activity group compared to the low activity group (OKS 45v40, KSS-F 95v78), there was no difference in the change in OKS or KSS-O.

CONCLUSIONS

High activity does not compromise the outcome of the Oxford UKR and may improve it. Activity should not be restricted nor considered to be a contraindication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford, United Kingdom.Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford, United Kingdom.Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford, United Kingdom.Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford, United Kingdom. Electronic address: david.murray@ndorms.ox.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial, Phase III
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26758852

Citation

Ali, Adam M., et al. "Does Activity Affect the Outcome of the Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Replacement?" The Knee, vol. 23, no. 2, 2016, pp. 327-30.
Ali AM, Pandit H, Liddle AD, et al. Does activity affect the outcome of the Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement? Knee. 2016;23(2):327-30.
Ali, A. M., Pandit, H., Liddle, A. D., Jenkins, C., Mellon, S., Dodd, C. A., & Murray, D. W. (2016). Does activity affect the outcome of the Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement? The Knee, 23(2), 327-30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.knee.2015.08.001
Ali AM, et al. Does Activity Affect the Outcome of the Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Replacement. Knee. 2016;23(2):327-30. PubMed PMID: 26758852.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does activity affect the outcome of the Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement? AU - Ali,Adam M, AU - Pandit,Hemant, AU - Liddle,Alexander D, AU - Jenkins,Cathy, AU - Mellon,Stephen, AU - Dodd,Christopher A F, AU - Murray,David W, Y1 - 2016/01/03/ PY - 2014/12/19/received PY - 2015/07/30/revised PY - 2015/08/03/accepted PY - 2016/1/14/entrez PY - 2016/1/14/pubmed PY - 2017/1/11/medline KW - Activity level KW - Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty SP - 327 EP - 30 JF - The Knee JO - Knee VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: High levels of activity are considered to be a contraindication to unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) and are not recommended after UKR. To determine if these recommendations should apply to the mobile-bearing Oxford UKR, this study assessed the effect of post-operative activity level on the outcome of this device. METHODS: The outcome of the first 1000 Phase 3 cemented Oxford UKRs implanted between 1998 and 2010 was assessed using survival analysis, the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and the American Knee Society Objective (KSS-O) and Functional (KSS-F) Scores. Patients were grouped according to the maximum post-operative Tegner Activity Score. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 6.1 years (range 1 to 14). Overall, increasing activity was associated with superior survival (p=0.025). In the high activity group, with Tegner≥5 (n=115) 2.6% were revised and the 12-year survival was 97.3% (confidence interval (CI): 92.0% to 99.1%). In the low activity group, with Tegner≤4, (n=885) 4.3% were revised and the 12-year survival was 94.0% (CI: 91.4 to 95.8). The difference between the two groups was not significant (p=0.44). Although the final OKS and KSS-F were significantly better in the high activity group compared to the low activity group (OKS 45v40, KSS-F 95v78), there was no difference in the change in OKS or KSS-O. CONCLUSIONS: High activity does not compromise the outcome of the Oxford UKR and may improve it. Activity should not be restricted nor considered to be a contraindication. SN - 1873-5800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26758852/Does_activity_affect_the_outcome_of_the_Oxford_unicompartmental_knee_replacement L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0968-0160(15)00170-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -