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How do case presentation teaching methods affect learning outcomes?--SNAPPS and the One-Minute preceptor.
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Jan 13; 16:12.BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Various techniques have been developed to enable preceptors to teach residents effectively in outpatient settings to promote active learning, including SNAPPS and the One-Minute Preceptor (OMP). This study aimed to ascertain the differences between SNAPPS and the OMP in case presentation content and learner evaluation when used to teach residents about case presentation.

METHODS

From 2011 to 2013, participants were 71 junior clinical residents employed in two hospitals for clinical training. They were randomly allocated to two groups, one using SNAPPS and the other the OMP. From recorded discussions, the "differential diagnoses", "questions and uncertainties", "treatment plans", and "learning issues" were counted. Also, a self-evaluation form was distributed at the end of the study to evaluate the residents' satisfaction with the case presentation.

RESULTS

Members of the SNAPPS group used significantly more meaning units related to questions and uncertainties compared with those of the OMP group (P < 0.001). Self-evaluation sheets revealed that members of the SNAPPS group had significantly higher positive responses than those of the OMP group in terms of the following evaluations: "It was easy to bring up questions and uncertainties" (P = 0.046), "It was easy to present the case efficiently" (P = 0.002), "It was easy to present the case in the sequence given" (P = 0.029), and "I was able to give an in-depth case presentation" (P = 0.005).

CONCLUSIONS

SNAPPS may induce more meaning units related to questions and uncertainties and give more satisfaction to residents than the OMP.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Education, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan. Department of Primary Care and General Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan. Department of General Internal Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-25-8 Nishi-Shinbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-8461, Japan.Department of Medical Education, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan. jo-tky@umin.ac.jp. Department of Primary Care and General Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan. jo-tky@umin.ac.jp. Center for Medical Education, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, North 15, West 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638, Japan. jo-tky@umin.ac.jp.Department of Medical Education, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan.Educational Institutional Research Center, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan.Department of Primary Care and General Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan.Department of Primary Care and General Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan.Department of General Internal Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-25-8 Nishi-Shinbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-8461, Japan.Department of General Internal Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-25-8 Nishi-Shinbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-8461, Japan.Department of Primary Care and General Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan.Department of Primary Care and General Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan.Department of Medical Education, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-0023, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26762292

Citation

Seki, Masayasu, et al. "How Do Case Presentation Teaching Methods Affect Learning outcomes?--SNAPPS and the One-Minute Preceptor." BMC Medical Education, vol. 16, 2016, p. 12.
Seki M, Otaki J, Breugelmans R, et al. How do case presentation teaching methods affect learning outcomes?--SNAPPS and the One-Minute preceptor. BMC Med Educ. 2016;16:12.
Seki, M., Otaki, J., Breugelmans, R., Komoda, T., Nagata-Kobayashi, S., Akaishi, Y., Hiramoto, J., Ohno, I., Harada, Y., Hirayama, Y., & Izumi, M. (2016). How do case presentation teaching methods affect learning outcomes?--SNAPPS and the One-Minute preceptor. BMC Medical Education, 16, 12. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12909-016-0531-6
Seki M, et al. How Do Case Presentation Teaching Methods Affect Learning outcomes?--SNAPPS and the One-Minute Preceptor. BMC Med Educ. 2016 Jan 13;16:12. PubMed PMID: 26762292.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How do case presentation teaching methods affect learning outcomes?--SNAPPS and the One-Minute preceptor. AU - Seki,Masayasu, AU - Otaki,Junji, AU - Breugelmans,Raoul, AU - Komoda,Takayuki, AU - Nagata-Kobayashi,Shizuko, AU - Akaishi,Yu, AU - Hiramoto,Jun, AU - Ohno,Iwao, AU - Harada,Yoshimi, AU - Hirayama,Yoji, AU - Izumi,Miki, Y1 - 2016/01/13/ PY - 2015/05/03/received PY - 2016/01/06/accepted PY - 2016/1/15/entrez PY - 2016/1/15/pubmed PY - 2016/10/7/medline SP - 12 EP - 12 JF - BMC medical education JO - BMC Med Educ VL - 16 N2 - BACKGROUND: Various techniques have been developed to enable preceptors to teach residents effectively in outpatient settings to promote active learning, including SNAPPS and the One-Minute Preceptor (OMP). This study aimed to ascertain the differences between SNAPPS and the OMP in case presentation content and learner evaluation when used to teach residents about case presentation. METHODS: From 2011 to 2013, participants were 71 junior clinical residents employed in two hospitals for clinical training. They were randomly allocated to two groups, one using SNAPPS and the other the OMP. From recorded discussions, the "differential diagnoses", "questions and uncertainties", "treatment plans", and "learning issues" were counted. Also, a self-evaluation form was distributed at the end of the study to evaluate the residents' satisfaction with the case presentation. RESULTS: Members of the SNAPPS group used significantly more meaning units related to questions and uncertainties compared with those of the OMP group (P < 0.001). Self-evaluation sheets revealed that members of the SNAPPS group had significantly higher positive responses than those of the OMP group in terms of the following evaluations: "It was easy to bring up questions and uncertainties" (P = 0.046), "It was easy to present the case efficiently" (P = 0.002), "It was easy to present the case in the sequence given" (P = 0.029), and "I was able to give an in-depth case presentation" (P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: SNAPPS may induce more meaning units related to questions and uncertainties and give more satisfaction to residents than the OMP. SN - 1472-6920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26762292/How_do_case_presentation_teaching_methods_affect_learning_outcomes__SNAPPS_and_the_One_Minute_preceptor_ L2 - https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909-016-0531-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -