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The risk of overweight/obesity in mid-life and late life for the development of dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies.

Abstract

SCOPE

it has been suggested that overweight/obesity as a risk factor for incident dementia differs between mid-life and later life. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the up-to-date current literature to assess this.

SEARCH METHODS

inclusion criteria included epidemiological longitudinal studies published up to September 2014, in participants without cognitive impairment based on evidence of cognitive assessment and aged 30 or over at baseline assessment with at least 2 years of follow-up. Pubmed, Medline, EMBASE, PsychInfo and the Cochrane Library were searched using combinations of the search terms: Dementia, Alzheimer disease, Vascular Dementia, Multi-Infarct Dementia, Cognitive decline, Cognitive impairment, Mild Cognitive Impairment/Obesity, Overweight, Adiposity, Waist circumference (limits: humans, English language). Handsearching of all papers meeting the inclusion criteria was performed. A random-effects model was used for the meta-analysis.

RESULTS

of the 1,612 abstracts identified and reviewed, 21 completely met the inclusion criteria. Being obese below the age of 65 years had a positive association on incident dementia with a risk ratio (RR) 1.41 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.20-1.66), but the opposite was seen in those aged 65 and over, RR 0.83 (95% CI: 0.74-0.94).

CONCLUSIONS

this systematic review and meta-analysis suggests a positive association between obesity in mid-life and later dementia but the opposite in late life. Whether weight reduction in mid-life reduces risk is worthy of further study.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Medicine, Imperial College, London, UK.

    ,

    Imperial College London, London, UK.

    Care of the Elderly, Imperial College London, London, UK.

    Source

    Age and ageing 45:1 2016 Jan pg 14-21

    MeSH

    Adult
    Age Factors
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Aging
    Cognition
    Dementia
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Odds Ratio
    Prognosis
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Time Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Review

    Language

    ENG

    PubMed ID

    26764391

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - The risk of overweight/obesity in mid-life and late life for the development of dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies. AU - Pedditizi,Emilio, AU - Peters,Ruth, AU - Beckett,Nigel, PY - 2016/1/15/entrez PY - 2016/1/15/pubmed PY - 2016/10/12/medline KW - aged KW - dementia KW - obesity KW - older people KW - overweight KW - systematic review SP - 14 EP - 21 JF - Age and ageing JO - Age Ageing VL - 45 IS - 1 N2 - SCOPE: it has been suggested that overweight/obesity as a risk factor for incident dementia differs between mid-life and later life. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the up-to-date current literature to assess this. SEARCH METHODS: inclusion criteria included epidemiological longitudinal studies published up to September 2014, in participants without cognitive impairment based on evidence of cognitive assessment and aged 30 or over at baseline assessment with at least 2 years of follow-up. Pubmed, Medline, EMBASE, PsychInfo and the Cochrane Library were searched using combinations of the search terms: Dementia, Alzheimer disease, Vascular Dementia, Multi-Infarct Dementia, Cognitive decline, Cognitive impairment, Mild Cognitive Impairment/Obesity, Overweight, Adiposity, Waist circumference (limits: humans, English language). Handsearching of all papers meeting the inclusion criteria was performed. A random-effects model was used for the meta-analysis. RESULTS: of the 1,612 abstracts identified and reviewed, 21 completely met the inclusion criteria. Being obese below the age of 65 years had a positive association on incident dementia with a risk ratio (RR) 1.41 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.20-1.66), but the opposite was seen in those aged 65 and over, RR 0.83 (95% CI: 0.74-0.94). CONCLUSIONS: this systematic review and meta-analysis suggests a positive association between obesity in mid-life and later dementia but the opposite in late life. Whether weight reduction in mid-life reduces risk is worthy of further study. SN - 1468-2834 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26764391/full_citation L2 - http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=26764391 ER -