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Extent of pleural effusion on chest radiograph is associated with failure of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy.
J Crit Care. 2016 Apr; 32:165-9.JC

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of the study was to determine whether pleural effusion (PE) is associated with a failure of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We conducted a single-center retrospective study. Seventy-three patients with acute respiratory failure given HFNC therapy between January 2012 and December 2014 were reviewed. HFNC failure was defined as intubation or noninvasive positive pressure ventilation following HFNC therapy. The numbers of quadrants with consolidation or ground glass opacity were counted on chest radiographs performed within 24 hours before starting HFNC therapy, and the PE score was calculated. PE score was the original score, verified by the computed tomographic images of some of the study patients.

RESULTS

Overall, 29 of 73 experienced HFNC failure. PE score was significantly greater in the HFNC failure group, but the number of quadrants with opacity was not significantly different. Age and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score were significantly greater in the HFNC failure group. The PE (odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.02; P = .01) and SOFA (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.68; P = .02) scores were independently associated with HFNC failure in multivariate analysis.

CONCLUSIONS

The extent of PE on chest radiograph and SOFA score were associated with HFNC failure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Advanced Medical Emergency and Critical Care Center, Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan. Electronic address: koga-ygc@umin.ac.jp.Advanced Medical Emergency and Critical Care Center, Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan.Advanced Medical Emergency and Critical Care Center, Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan.Advanced Medical Emergency and Critical Care Center, Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan.Advanced Medical Emergency and Critical Care Center, Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan.Acute and General Medicine, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan.Advanced Medical Emergency and Critical Care Center, Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan.Acute and General Medicine, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan.Advanced Medical Emergency and Critical Care Center, Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan; Acute and General Medicine, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26764577

Citation

Koga, Yasutaka, et al. "Extent of Pleural Effusion On Chest Radiograph Is Associated With Failure of High-flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy." Journal of Critical Care, vol. 32, 2016, pp. 165-9.
Koga Y, Kaneda K, Mizuguchi I, et al. Extent of pleural effusion on chest radiograph is associated with failure of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy. J Crit Care. 2016;32:165-9.
Koga, Y., Kaneda, K., Mizuguchi, I., Nakahara, T., Miyauchi, T., Fujita, M., Kawamura, Y., Oda, Y., & Tsuruta, R. (2016). Extent of pleural effusion on chest radiograph is associated with failure of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy. Journal of Critical Care, 32, 165-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrc.2015.12.001
Koga Y, et al. Extent of Pleural Effusion On Chest Radiograph Is Associated With Failure of High-flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy. J Crit Care. 2016;32:165-9. PubMed PMID: 26764577.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Extent of pleural effusion on chest radiograph is associated with failure of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy. AU - Koga,Yasutaka, AU - Kaneda,Kotaro, AU - Mizuguchi,Ichiko, AU - Nakahara,Takashi, AU - Miyauchi,Takashi, AU - Fujita,Motoki, AU - Kawamura,Yoshikatsu, AU - Oda,Yasutaka, AU - Tsuruta,Ryosuke, Y1 - 2015/12/11/ PY - 2015/07/22/received PY - 2015/11/27/revised PY - 2015/12/01/accepted PY - 2016/1/15/entrez PY - 2016/1/15/pubmed PY - 2016/10/21/medline KW - Acute respiratory failure KW - High-flow nasal cannula KW - Oxygen therapy KW - Pleural effusion SP - 165 EP - 9 JF - Journal of critical care JO - J Crit Care VL - 32 N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to determine whether pleural effusion (PE) is associated with a failure of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a single-center retrospective study. Seventy-three patients with acute respiratory failure given HFNC therapy between January 2012 and December 2014 were reviewed. HFNC failure was defined as intubation or noninvasive positive pressure ventilation following HFNC therapy. The numbers of quadrants with consolidation or ground glass opacity were counted on chest radiographs performed within 24 hours before starting HFNC therapy, and the PE score was calculated. PE score was the original score, verified by the computed tomographic images of some of the study patients. RESULTS: Overall, 29 of 73 experienced HFNC failure. PE score was significantly greater in the HFNC failure group, but the number of quadrants with opacity was not significantly different. Age and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score were significantly greater in the HFNC failure group. The PE (odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.02; P = .01) and SOFA (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.68; P = .02) scores were independently associated with HFNC failure in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The extent of PE on chest radiograph and SOFA score were associated with HFNC failure. SN - 1557-8615 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26764577/Extent_of_pleural_effusion_on_chest_radiograph_is_associated_with_failure_of_high_flow_nasal_cannula_oxygen_therapy_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0883-9441(15)00604-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -