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Does infrared or ultraviolet light damage the lens?
Eye (Lond) 2016; 30(2):241-6E

Abstract

In daylight, the human eye is exposed to long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVR), visible radiation and short wavelength infrared radiation (IRR). Almost all the UVR and a fraction of the IRR waveband, respectively, left over after attenuation in the cornea, is absorbed in the lens. The time delay between exposure and onset of biological response in the lens varies from immediate-to-short-to-late. After exposure to sunlight or artificial sources, generating irradiances of the same order of magnitude or slightly higher, biological damage may occur photochemically or thermally. Epidemiological studies suggest a dose-dependent association between short wavelength UVR and cortical cataract. Experimental data infer that repeated daily in vivo exposures to short wavelength UVR generate photochemically induced damage in the lens, and that short delay onset cataract after UVR exposure is photochemically induced. Epidemiology suggests that daily high-intensity short wavelength IRR exposure of workers, is associated with a higher prevalence of age-related cataract. It cannot be excluded that this effect is owing to a thermally induced higher denaturation rate. Recent experimental data rule out a photochemical effect of 1090 nm in the lens but other wavelengths in the near IRR should be investigated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, Gullstrand laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, Gullstrand laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, Gullstrand laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, Gullstrand laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26768915

Citation

Söderberg, P G., et al. "Does Infrared or Ultraviolet Light Damage the Lens?" Eye (London, England), vol. 30, no. 2, 2016, pp. 241-6.
Söderberg PG, Talebizadeh N, Yu Z, et al. Does infrared or ultraviolet light damage the lens? Eye (Lond). 2016;30(2):241-6.
Söderberg, P. G., Talebizadeh, N., Yu, Z., & Galichanin, K. (2016). Does infrared or ultraviolet light damage the lens? Eye (London, England), 30(2), pp. 241-6. doi:10.1038/eye.2015.266.
Söderberg PG, et al. Does Infrared or Ultraviolet Light Damage the Lens. Eye (Lond). 2016;30(2):241-6. PubMed PMID: 26768915.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does infrared or ultraviolet light damage the lens? AU - Söderberg,P G, AU - Talebizadeh,N, AU - Yu,Z, AU - Galichanin,K, Y1 - 2016/01/15/ PY - 2015/09/08/received PY - 2015/11/18/accepted PY - 2016/1/16/entrez PY - 2016/1/16/pubmed PY - 2016/9/30/medline SP - 241 EP - 6 JF - Eye (London, England) JO - Eye (Lond) VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - In daylight, the human eye is exposed to long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVR), visible radiation and short wavelength infrared radiation (IRR). Almost all the UVR and a fraction of the IRR waveband, respectively, left over after attenuation in the cornea, is absorbed in the lens. The time delay between exposure and onset of biological response in the lens varies from immediate-to-short-to-late. After exposure to sunlight or artificial sources, generating irradiances of the same order of magnitude or slightly higher, biological damage may occur photochemically or thermally. Epidemiological studies suggest a dose-dependent association between short wavelength UVR and cortical cataract. Experimental data infer that repeated daily in vivo exposures to short wavelength UVR generate photochemically induced damage in the lens, and that short delay onset cataract after UVR exposure is photochemically induced. Epidemiology suggests that daily high-intensity short wavelength IRR exposure of workers, is associated with a higher prevalence of age-related cataract. It cannot be excluded that this effect is owing to a thermally induced higher denaturation rate. Recent experimental data rule out a photochemical effect of 1090 nm in the lens but other wavelengths in the near IRR should be investigated. SN - 1476-5454 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26768915/Does_infrared_or_ultraviolet_light_damage_the_lens L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/eye.2015.266 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -