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Removing Potatoes from Children's Diets May Compromise Potassium Intake.
Adv Nutr 2016; 7(1):247S-253SAN

Abstract

White potatoes are a forgotten source of nutrients. The goal of this study was to identify the nutritional implications of replacing a composite of white potatoes with a composite of vegetables commonly consumed by children aged 2-18 y (n = 3460) in a nationally representative sample. The NHANES 2005-2012 24-h dietary recall data were used to determine nutrient intake. Two replacement models were developed: one for potato consumers and another for those consuming vegetables other than potatoes. Analyses focused on 1) mean nutrient contributions per 1 cup equivalent vegetable composite (VC)/potato composite (PC) consumed by participants, and 2) mean daily nutrient intake when the nutrients per 1 cup equivalent PC replaced the nutrients per 1 cup equivalent VC. Covariate adjusted analysis was tested for statistical significance (P < 0.002). When 1 cup equivalent VC replaced 1 cup equivalent PC, significantly lower mean intakes were found for 20 of the 23 nutrients studied and higher mean intakes of total sugars, folate, and calcium. Differences were found including higher total intakes of monounsaturated fatty acids and potassium and lower total intakes of vitamins A and K. The percentage contribution of the PC to total daily nutrient intake was 6% for total energy, 8% for total fat, 5% for saturated fatty acids, 13% for dietary fiber, 4% for sodium, and 11% for potassium. Both composites contributed a variety of nutrients to the total diet; the consumption of white potatoes may be an important strategy to help meet the potassium recommendation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

USDA/Agricultural Research Service Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; and tnicklas@bcm.edu.USDA/Agricultural Research Service Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; and.USDA/Agricultural Research Service Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; and.School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26773033

Citation

Nicklas, Theresa A., et al. "Removing Potatoes From Children's Diets May Compromise Potassium Intake." Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.), vol. 7, no. 1, 2016, 247S-253S.
Nicklas TA, Liu Y, Islam N, et al. Removing Potatoes from Children's Diets May Compromise Potassium Intake. Adv Nutr. 2016;7(1):247S-253S.
Nicklas, T. A., Liu, Y., Islam, N., & O'Neil, C. E. (2016). Removing Potatoes from Children's Diets May Compromise Potassium Intake. Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.), 7(1), 247S-253S. doi:10.3945/an.115.008680.
Nicklas TA, et al. Removing Potatoes From Children's Diets May Compromise Potassium Intake. Adv Nutr. 2016;7(1):247S-253S. PubMed PMID: 26773033.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Removing Potatoes from Children's Diets May Compromise Potassium Intake. AU - Nicklas,Theresa A, AU - Liu,Yan, AU - Islam,Noemi, AU - O'Neil,Carol E, Y1 - 2016/01/15/ PY - 2016/1/17/entrez PY - 2016/1/17/pubmed PY - 2016/10/19/medline KW - NHANES KW - fiber KW - nutrients KW - potassium KW - potatoes KW - statistical modeling KW - vegetables SP - 247S EP - 253S JF - Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.) JO - Adv Nutr VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - White potatoes are a forgotten source of nutrients. The goal of this study was to identify the nutritional implications of replacing a composite of white potatoes with a composite of vegetables commonly consumed by children aged 2-18 y (n = 3460) in a nationally representative sample. The NHANES 2005-2012 24-h dietary recall data were used to determine nutrient intake. Two replacement models were developed: one for potato consumers and another for those consuming vegetables other than potatoes. Analyses focused on 1) mean nutrient contributions per 1 cup equivalent vegetable composite (VC)/potato composite (PC) consumed by participants, and 2) mean daily nutrient intake when the nutrients per 1 cup equivalent PC replaced the nutrients per 1 cup equivalent VC. Covariate adjusted analysis was tested for statistical significance (P < 0.002). When 1 cup equivalent VC replaced 1 cup equivalent PC, significantly lower mean intakes were found for 20 of the 23 nutrients studied and higher mean intakes of total sugars, folate, and calcium. Differences were found including higher total intakes of monounsaturated fatty acids and potassium and lower total intakes of vitamins A and K. The percentage contribution of the PC to total daily nutrient intake was 6% for total energy, 8% for total fat, 5% for saturated fatty acids, 13% for dietary fiber, 4% for sodium, and 11% for potassium. Both composites contributed a variety of nutrients to the total diet; the consumption of white potatoes may be an important strategy to help meet the potassium recommendation. SN - 2156-5376 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26773033/Removing_Potatoes_from_Children's_Diets_May_Compromise_Potassium_Intake_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/advances/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/an.115.008680 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -