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Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.
Dent Mater. 2016 Apr; 32(4):499-509.DM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference.

METHODS

Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n=24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n=24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electron microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures.

RESULTS

The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450N.

SIGNIFICANCE

Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3-4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, 433 First Avenue, New York, NY 10010, USA.Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, 433 First Avenue, New York, NY 10010, USA; School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083, PR China.Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, 433 First Avenue, New York, NY 10010, USA; Graduate Program in Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, New York University College of Dentistry, 380 Second Avenue Suite 301, New York, NY 10010, USA.Tissue Engineering and Biophotonics, King's College London Dental Institute, United Kingdom.Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, College of Dental Sciences, Preventive and Restorative Dentistry, Ph van Leydenlaan 25, PO Box 9101, 6500HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, 433 First Avenue, New York, NY 10010, USA. Electronic address: yz21@nyu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26777092

Citation

Shembish, Fatma A., et al. "Fatigue Resistance of CAD/CAM Resin Composite Molar Crowns." Dental Materials : Official Publication of the Academy of Dental Materials, vol. 32, no. 4, 2016, pp. 499-509.
Shembish FA, Tong H, Kaizer M, et al. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns. Dent Mater. 2016;32(4):499-509.
Shembish, F. A., Tong, H., Kaizer, M., Janal, M. N., Thompson, V. P., Opdam, N. J., & Zhang, Y. (2016). Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns. Dental Materials : Official Publication of the Academy of Dental Materials, 32(4), 499-509. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dental.2015.12.005
Shembish FA, et al. Fatigue Resistance of CAD/CAM Resin Composite Molar Crowns. Dent Mater. 2016;32(4):499-509. PubMed PMID: 26777092.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns. AU - Shembish,Fatma A, AU - Tong,Hui, AU - Kaizer,Marina, AU - Janal,Malvin N, AU - Thompson,Van P, AU - Opdam,Niek J, AU - Zhang,Yu, Y1 - 2016/01/08/ PY - 2015/06/27/received PY - 2015/11/03/revised PY - 2015/12/07/accepted PY - 2016/1/19/entrez PY - 2016/1/19/pubmed PY - 2017/8/9/medline KW - CAD/CAM crowns KW - Fatigue KW - Fracture KW - Glass-ceramic KW - Resin composite KW - Weibull analysis SP - 499 EP - 509 JF - Dental materials : official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials JO - Dent Mater VL - 32 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. METHODS: Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n=24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n=24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electron microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. RESULTS: The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450N. SIGNIFICANCE: Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3-4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. SN - 1879-0097 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26777092/Fatigue_resistance_of_CAD/CAM_resin_composite_molar_crowns_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0109-5641(15)00508-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -