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Consumption of citrus and cruciferous vegetables with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus based on a meta-analysis of prospective study.
Prim Care Diabetes 2016; 10(4):272-80PC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Observational studies and meta-analyses suggested that increased total fruits and vegetables consumption have a protective role in incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, we still don't know whether the subtypes, such as citrus fruits and cruciferous vegetables (CV), have a preventive role.

METHODS

We systematically searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases up to December 31, 2014. Summary relative risks (SRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects models.

RESULTS

Seven distinct prospective cohort studies (five articles) were identified for this study. A total of 16,544 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained among 306,723 participants with follow-up periods ranging from 4.6 to 24 years. Based on four prospective cohort studies, we found that overall, consumption of CV had a protective role in the T2DM incidence (highest vs. lowest analysis: SRR=0.84, 95% CI: 0.73 to 0.96), with evidence of significant heterogeneity (P=0.09, I(2)=54.4%). This association was independent of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease: smoking, alcohol use, BMI, and physical activity etc. Consumption of citrus fruits did not have a protective role in the T2DM development (highest vs. lowest analysis: SRR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.08), with no evidence of significant heterogeneity (P=0.49, I(2)=0).

CONCLUSIONS

Higher consumption of CV, but not citrus fruits, is associated with a significantly decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. Further large prospective studies are needed to elucidate both relationships.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Geriatrics, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, 266003 Qingdao, Shandong, China.Department of Geriatrics, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, 266003 Qingdao, Shandong, China.Department of Geriatrics, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, 266003 Qingdao, Shandong, China.Department of Geriatrics, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, 266003 Qingdao, Shandong, China.Department of Geriatrics, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, 266003 Qingdao, Shandong, China.Department of Geriatrics, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, 16 Jiangsu Road, 266003 Qingdao, Shandong, China. Electronic address: sunsq0011@126.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26778708

Citation

Jia, Xiujuan, et al. "Consumption of Citrus and Cruciferous Vegetables With Incident Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Based On a Meta-analysis of Prospective Study." Primary Care Diabetes, vol. 10, no. 4, 2016, pp. 272-80.
Jia X, Zhong L, Song Y, et al. Consumption of citrus and cruciferous vegetables with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus based on a meta-analysis of prospective study. Prim Care Diabetes. 2016;10(4):272-80.
Jia, X., Zhong, L., Song, Y., Hu, Y., Wang, G., & Sun, S. (2016). Consumption of citrus and cruciferous vegetables with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus based on a meta-analysis of prospective study. Primary Care Diabetes, 10(4), pp. 272-80. doi:10.1016/j.pcd.2015.12.004.
Jia X, et al. Consumption of Citrus and Cruciferous Vegetables With Incident Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Based On a Meta-analysis of Prospective Study. Prim Care Diabetes. 2016;10(4):272-80. PubMed PMID: 26778708.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of citrus and cruciferous vegetables with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus based on a meta-analysis of prospective study. AU - Jia,Xiujuan, AU - Zhong,Lina, AU - Song,Yan, AU - Hu,Yi, AU - Wang,Guimei, AU - Sun,Shuqin, Y1 - 2016/01/06/ PY - 2015/03/14/received PY - 2015/11/23/revised PY - 2015/12/12/accepted PY - 2016/1/19/entrez PY - 2016/1/19/pubmed PY - 2017/10/12/medline KW - Citrus fruits KW - Cruciferous vegetables KW - Type 2 diabetes mellitus SP - 272 EP - 80 JF - Primary care diabetes JO - Prim Care Diabetes VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Observational studies and meta-analyses suggested that increased total fruits and vegetables consumption have a protective role in incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, we still don't know whether the subtypes, such as citrus fruits and cruciferous vegetables (CV), have a preventive role. METHODS: We systematically searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases up to December 31, 2014. Summary relative risks (SRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects models. RESULTS: Seven distinct prospective cohort studies (five articles) were identified for this study. A total of 16,544 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained among 306,723 participants with follow-up periods ranging from 4.6 to 24 years. Based on four prospective cohort studies, we found that overall, consumption of CV had a protective role in the T2DM incidence (highest vs. lowest analysis: SRR=0.84, 95% CI: 0.73 to 0.96), with evidence of significant heterogeneity (P=0.09, I(2)=54.4%). This association was independent of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease: smoking, alcohol use, BMI, and physical activity etc. Consumption of citrus fruits did not have a protective role in the T2DM development (highest vs. lowest analysis: SRR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.08), with no evidence of significant heterogeneity (P=0.49, I(2)=0). CONCLUSIONS: Higher consumption of CV, but not citrus fruits, is associated with a significantly decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. Further large prospective studies are needed to elucidate both relationships. SN - 1878-0210 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26778708/Consumption_of_citrus_and_cruciferous_vegetables_with_incident_type_2_diabetes_mellitus_based_on_a_meta_analysis_of_prospective_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1751-9918(15)00182-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -