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Impact of Nonoptimal Intakes of Saturated, Polyunsaturated, and Trans Fat on Global Burdens of Coronary Heart Disease.
J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Jan 20; 5(1)JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Saturated fat (SFA), ω-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fat (PUFA), and trans fat (TFA) influence risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but attributable CHD mortalities by country, age, sex, and time are unclear.

METHODS AND RESULTS

National intakes of SFA, n-6 PUFA, and TFA were estimated using a Bayesian hierarchical model based on country-specific dietary surveys; food availability data; and, for TFA, industry reports on fats/oils and packaged foods. Etiologic effects of dietary fats on CHD mortality were derived from meta-analyses of prospective cohorts and CHD mortality rates from the 2010 Global Burden of Diseases study. Absolute and proportional attributable CHD mortality were computed using a comparative risk assessment framework. In 2010, nonoptimal intakes of n-6 PUFA, SFA, and TFA were estimated to result in 711 800 (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 680 700-745 000), 250 900 (95% UI 236 900-265 800), and 537 200 (95% UI 517 600-557 000) CHD deaths per year worldwide, accounting for 10.3% (95% UI 9.9%-10.6%), 3.6%, (95% UI 3.5%-3.6%) and 7.7% (95% UI 7.6%-7.9%) of global CHD mortality. Tropical oil-consuming countries were estimated to have the highest proportional n-6 PUFA- and SFA-attributable CHD mortality, whereas Egypt, Pakistan, and Canada were estimated to have the highest proportional TFA-attributable CHD mortality. From 1990 to 2010 globally, the estimated proportional CHD mortality decreased by 9% for insufficient n-6 PUFA and by 21% for higher SFA, whereas it increased by 4% for higher TFA, with the latter driven by increases in low- and middle-income countries.

CONCLUSIONS

Nonoptimal intakes of n-6 PUFA, TFA, and SFA each contribute to significant estimated CHD mortality, with important heterogeneity across countries that informs nation-specific clinical, public health, and policy priorities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (Q.W., M.Y.Y., S.K.).Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA (A.A., G.M.S., C.D.R., R.M., P.S., D.M.).Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (Q.W., M.Y.Y., S.K.).Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA (A.A., G.M.S., C.D.R., R.M., P.S., D.M.).Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA (A.A., G.M.S., C.D.R., R.M., P.S., D.M.).Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (Q.W., M.Y.Y., S.K.).Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA (A.A., G.M.S., C.D.R., R.M., P.S., D.M.).Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA (A.A., G.M.S., C.D.R., R.M., P.S., D.M.).Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA (A.A., G.M.S., C.D.R., R.M., P.S., D.M.).No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26790695

Citation

Wang, Qianyi, et al. "Impact of Nonoptimal Intakes of Saturated, Polyunsaturated, and Trans Fat On Global Burdens of Coronary Heart Disease." Journal of the American Heart Association, vol. 5, no. 1, 2016.
Wang Q, Afshin A, Yakoob MY, et al. Impact of Nonoptimal Intakes of Saturated, Polyunsaturated, and Trans Fat on Global Burdens of Coronary Heart Disease. J Am Heart Assoc. 2016;5(1).
Wang, Q., Afshin, A., Yakoob, M. Y., Singh, G. M., Rehm, C. D., Khatibzadeh, S., Micha, R., Shi, P., & Mozaffarian, D. (2016). Impact of Nonoptimal Intakes of Saturated, Polyunsaturated, and Trans Fat on Global Burdens of Coronary Heart Disease. Journal of the American Heart Association, 5(1). https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.115.002891
Wang Q, et al. Impact of Nonoptimal Intakes of Saturated, Polyunsaturated, and Trans Fat On Global Burdens of Coronary Heart Disease. J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Jan 20;5(1) PubMed PMID: 26790695.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of Nonoptimal Intakes of Saturated, Polyunsaturated, and Trans Fat on Global Burdens of Coronary Heart Disease. AU - Wang,Qianyi, AU - Afshin,Ashkan, AU - Yakoob,Mohammad Yawar, AU - Singh,Gitanjali M, AU - Rehm,Colin D, AU - Khatibzadeh,Shahab, AU - Micha,Renata, AU - Shi,Peilin, AU - Mozaffarian,Dariush, AU - ,, Y1 - 2016/01/20/ PY - 2016/1/22/entrez PY - 2016/1/23/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - cardiovascular disease KW - coronary heart disease KW - dietary fat KW - saturated fat KW - trans fat KW - ω‐6 polyunsaturated fat JF - Journal of the American Heart Association JO - J Am Heart Assoc VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Saturated fat (SFA), ω-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fat (PUFA), and trans fat (TFA) influence risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but attributable CHD mortalities by country, age, sex, and time are unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: National intakes of SFA, n-6 PUFA, and TFA were estimated using a Bayesian hierarchical model based on country-specific dietary surveys; food availability data; and, for TFA, industry reports on fats/oils and packaged foods. Etiologic effects of dietary fats on CHD mortality were derived from meta-analyses of prospective cohorts and CHD mortality rates from the 2010 Global Burden of Diseases study. Absolute and proportional attributable CHD mortality were computed using a comparative risk assessment framework. In 2010, nonoptimal intakes of n-6 PUFA, SFA, and TFA were estimated to result in 711 800 (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 680 700-745 000), 250 900 (95% UI 236 900-265 800), and 537 200 (95% UI 517 600-557 000) CHD deaths per year worldwide, accounting for 10.3% (95% UI 9.9%-10.6%), 3.6%, (95% UI 3.5%-3.6%) and 7.7% (95% UI 7.6%-7.9%) of global CHD mortality. Tropical oil-consuming countries were estimated to have the highest proportional n-6 PUFA- and SFA-attributable CHD mortality, whereas Egypt, Pakistan, and Canada were estimated to have the highest proportional TFA-attributable CHD mortality. From 1990 to 2010 globally, the estimated proportional CHD mortality decreased by 9% for insufficient n-6 PUFA and by 21% for higher SFA, whereas it increased by 4% for higher TFA, with the latter driven by increases in low- and middle-income countries. CONCLUSIONS: Nonoptimal intakes of n-6 PUFA, TFA, and SFA each contribute to significant estimated CHD mortality, with important heterogeneity across countries that informs nation-specific clinical, public health, and policy priorities. SN - 2047-9980 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26790695/Impact_of_Nonoptimal_Intakes_of_Saturated_Polyunsaturated_and_Trans_Fat_on_Global_Burdens_of_Coronary_Heart_Disease_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/JAHA.115.002891?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -