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Phytotoxicity and accumulation of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the aquatic plants Hydrilla verticillata and Phragmites Australis: leaf-type-dependent responses.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 May; 23(9):8539-45.ES

Abstract

The phytotoxicity and accumulation of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata and Phragmites australis were investigated using mesocosms. The percentage of dissolved Zn in the ZnO NP treatment solutions was measured along with plant shoot growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, chlorophyll content, and Zn content. The dissolution rate of ZnO NPs in Hoagland solution was inversely related to the concentration. The submerged aquatic plant H. verticillata, growth was reduced during the early stages of the experiment when exposed to the highest ZnO NP concentration (1000 mg/L), whereas the emerged aquatic plant P. australis began to show significantly reduced growth after a few weeks. The measurements of chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme activity, and Zn accumulation showed that P. australis was adversely affected by NPs and absorbed more Zn than H. verticillata. The results indicated that physiological differences among aquatic plants, such as whether they use leaves or roots for nutrient and water uptake, led to differences in nanoparticle toxicity. Overall, High ZnO NP concentrations caused significant phytotoxicity on aquatic plants, and low concentrations caused unpredictable phytotoxicity. Therefore, the use and disposal of zinc oxide nanoparticles should be carefully monitored.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Jeju National University, Jeju, 690-756, Republic of Korea. uhrami@gmail.com. Natural Science Building 1, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehak-ro, Jeju, 690-756, Republic of Korea. uhrami@gmail.com.Department of Biology and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Jeju National University, Jeju, 690-756, Republic of Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26797943

Citation

Song, Uhram, and Sunryung Lee. "Phytotoxicity and Accumulation of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles On the Aquatic Plants Hydrilla Verticillata and Phragmites Australis: Leaf-type-dependent Responses." Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, vol. 23, no. 9, 2016, pp. 8539-45.
Song U, Lee S. Phytotoxicity and accumulation of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the aquatic plants Hydrilla verticillata and Phragmites Australis: leaf-type-dependent responses. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016;23(9):8539-45.
Song, U., & Lee, S. (2016). Phytotoxicity and accumulation of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the aquatic plants Hydrilla verticillata and Phragmites Australis: leaf-type-dependent responses. Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, 23(9), 8539-45. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-015-5982-5
Song U, Lee S. Phytotoxicity and Accumulation of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles On the Aquatic Plants Hydrilla Verticillata and Phragmites Australis: Leaf-type-dependent Responses. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016;23(9):8539-45. PubMed PMID: 26797943.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Phytotoxicity and accumulation of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the aquatic plants Hydrilla verticillata and Phragmites Australis: leaf-type-dependent responses. AU - Song,Uhram, AU - Lee,Sunryung, Y1 - 2016/01/22/ PY - 2015/05/04/received PY - 2015/12/14/accepted PY - 2016/1/23/entrez PY - 2016/1/23/pubmed PY - 2017/4/5/medline KW - Aquatic plants KW - Emerged plant KW - Heavy metal stress KW - Phytotoxicity KW - Submerged plant KW - Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) SP - 8539 EP - 45 JF - Environmental science and pollution research international JO - Environ Sci Pollut Res Int VL - 23 IS - 9 N2 - The phytotoxicity and accumulation of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata and Phragmites australis were investigated using mesocosms. The percentage of dissolved Zn in the ZnO NP treatment solutions was measured along with plant shoot growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, chlorophyll content, and Zn content. The dissolution rate of ZnO NPs in Hoagland solution was inversely related to the concentration. The submerged aquatic plant H. verticillata, growth was reduced during the early stages of the experiment when exposed to the highest ZnO NP concentration (1000 mg/L), whereas the emerged aquatic plant P. australis began to show significantly reduced growth after a few weeks. The measurements of chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme activity, and Zn accumulation showed that P. australis was adversely affected by NPs and absorbed more Zn than H. verticillata. The results indicated that physiological differences among aquatic plants, such as whether they use leaves or roots for nutrient and water uptake, led to differences in nanoparticle toxicity. Overall, High ZnO NP concentrations caused significant phytotoxicity on aquatic plants, and low concentrations caused unpredictable phytotoxicity. Therefore, the use and disposal of zinc oxide nanoparticles should be carefully monitored. SN - 1614-7499 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26797943/Phytotoxicity_and_accumulation_of_zinc_oxide_nanoparticles_on_the_aquatic_plants_Hydrilla_verticillata_and_Phragmites_Australis:_leaf_type_dependent_responses_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-015-5982-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -