Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sex differences in genetic and environmental contributions to alcohol consumption from early adolescence to young adulthood.
Addiction. 2016 07; 111(7):1188-95.A

Abstract

AIMS

To estimate genetic and environmental contributions to alcohol consumption from early adolescence to young adulthood, and test whether gender moderates these effects.

DESIGN

Longitudinal twin cohort design.

SETTING

Population-based sample from Norway.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 2862 male and female twins, aged 14-22 years, were assessed at one (n = 881), two (n = 898) or three (n = 1083) occasions. The percentage of females was between 56 and 63 in the different age groups (in the different waves).

MEASUREMENTS

Alcohol consumption was measured by two questionnaire items about frequency of alcohol use and frequency of being drunk.

FINDINGS

Additive genetic effects showed low to moderate contributions [proportion estimate, 95% confidence interval (CI) = range from 0.03 (0.00-0.14) to 0.49 (0.37-0.59) in males and from 0.09 (0.00-0.57) to 0.41 (0.24-0.58) in females] from adolescence to young adulthood, while environmental influences shared by twin pairs and contributing to twin similarity were moderate to highly influential during this developmental period [proportion estimate, 95% CI = range from 0.04 (0.00-0.13) to 0.45 (0.26-0.60) in males for shared environment in common with females, from 0.25 (0.09-0.42) to 0.54 (0.06-0.78) for shared environment specific to males and from 0.36 (0.20-0.52) to 0.51 (0.37-0.71) in females]. There was evidence of qualitative sex differences with shared environmental influences being largely sex-specific from middle adolescence onwards.

CONCLUSIONS

Alcohol consumption from early adolescence to young adulthood appears to be influenced to a small to moderate degree by genetic factors and to a moderate to high degree by shared environmental factors (e.g. rearing influences, shared friends). The shared environmental factors influencing alcohol consumption appear to be largely gender-specific.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26802679

Citation

Seglem, Karoline B., et al. "Sex Differences in Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Alcohol Consumption From Early Adolescence to Young Adulthood." Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 111, no. 7, 2016, pp. 1188-95.
Seglem KB, Waaktaar T, Ask H, et al. Sex differences in genetic and environmental contributions to alcohol consumption from early adolescence to young adulthood. Addiction. 2016;111(7):1188-95.
Seglem, K. B., Waaktaar, T., Ask, H., & Torgersen, S. (2016). Sex differences in genetic and environmental contributions to alcohol consumption from early adolescence to young adulthood. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 111(7), 1188-95. https://doi.org/10.1111/add.13321
Seglem KB, et al. Sex Differences in Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Alcohol Consumption From Early Adolescence to Young Adulthood. Addiction. 2016;111(7):1188-95. PubMed PMID: 26802679.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex differences in genetic and environmental contributions to alcohol consumption from early adolescence to young adulthood. AU - Seglem,Karoline B, AU - Waaktaar,Trine, AU - Ask,Helga, AU - Torgersen,Svenn, Y1 - 2016/02/27/ PY - 2015/06/01/received PY - 2015/10/01/revised PY - 2016/01/21/accepted PY - 2016/1/24/entrez PY - 2016/1/24/pubmed PY - 2018/1/20/medline KW - Adolescence KW - aetiology KW - alcohol consumption KW - longitudinal KW - sex differences KW - twin SP - 1188 EP - 95 JF - Addiction (Abingdon, England) JO - Addiction VL - 111 IS - 7 N2 - AIMS: To estimate genetic and environmental contributions to alcohol consumption from early adolescence to young adulthood, and test whether gender moderates these effects. DESIGN: Longitudinal twin cohort design. SETTING: Population-based sample from Norway. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 2862 male and female twins, aged 14-22 years, were assessed at one (n = 881), two (n = 898) or three (n = 1083) occasions. The percentage of females was between 56 and 63 in the different age groups (in the different waves). MEASUREMENTS: Alcohol consumption was measured by two questionnaire items about frequency of alcohol use and frequency of being drunk. FINDINGS: Additive genetic effects showed low to moderate contributions [proportion estimate, 95% confidence interval (CI) = range from 0.03 (0.00-0.14) to 0.49 (0.37-0.59) in males and from 0.09 (0.00-0.57) to 0.41 (0.24-0.58) in females] from adolescence to young adulthood, while environmental influences shared by twin pairs and contributing to twin similarity were moderate to highly influential during this developmental period [proportion estimate, 95% CI = range from 0.04 (0.00-0.13) to 0.45 (0.26-0.60) in males for shared environment in common with females, from 0.25 (0.09-0.42) to 0.54 (0.06-0.78) for shared environment specific to males and from 0.36 (0.20-0.52) to 0.51 (0.37-0.71) in females]. There was evidence of qualitative sex differences with shared environmental influences being largely sex-specific from middle adolescence onwards. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol consumption from early adolescence to young adulthood appears to be influenced to a small to moderate degree by genetic factors and to a moderate to high degree by shared environmental factors (e.g. rearing influences, shared friends). The shared environmental factors influencing alcohol consumption appear to be largely gender-specific. SN - 1360-0443 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26802679/Sex_differences_in_genetic_and_environmental_contributions_to_alcohol_consumption_from_early_adolescence_to_young_adulthood_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/add.13321 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -