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Clinical Correlates of Hoarding With and Without Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in a Community Pediatric Sample.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We assessed the prevalence and clinical correlates of hoarding, with and without obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms, in a community-based pediatric sample.

METHOD

We measured hoarding and OC symptoms using the Toronto Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (TOCS) in 16,718 youth aged 6 to 17 years in the community. We classified participants with high and low symptom counts for hoarding and OC into 4 groups: hoarding+OC; hoarding-only; OC-only; and control (no OC or hoarding symptoms). We compared these 4 groups on parent- or self-reported medical and psychiatric conditions, anxiety symptoms measured with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms measured with the Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal Behavior Scale (SWAN).

RESULTS

Almost 10% of participants were in the high hoarding group. Of these participants, 40% did not fall into the high OC group. The prevalence of reported psychiatric disorders (e.g., ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder) was greater in the hoarding (hoarding+OC and hoarding-only) and OC groups (hoarding+OC and OC-only) than in the nonhoarding (OC-only and control) and non-OC groups (hoarding-only and control), respectively. ADHD, specifically inattentive, symptoms were more common in the hoarding-only than in the OC-only group while anxiety symptoms were more common in the OC-only than in the hoarding-only group.

CONCLUSION

In a community pediatric sample, hoarding symptoms occurred in both the presence and absence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Hoarding symptoms alone had some unique clinical correlates, in particular, more inattentive ADHD symptoms and fewer anxiety symptoms. These findings suggest that hoarding is distinct from OC traits in youth.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: c.burton@utoronto.ca.

    ,

    Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada; University of Toronto.

    ,

    Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada; Dalla School of Public Health, University of Toronto.

    ,

    Genetics Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville.

    ,

    St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada, and McMaster University, Hamilton.

    ,

    Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada; Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Toronto.

    Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada; Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Anxiety
    Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
    Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Case-Control Studies
    Child
    Comorbidity
    Female
    Hoarding
    Humans
    Male
    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
    Self Report
    Severity of Illness Index
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26802778

    Citation

    Burton, Christie L., et al. "Clinical Correlates of Hoarding With and Without Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in a Community Pediatric Sample." Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 55, no. 2, 2016, pp. 114-21.e2.
    Burton CL, Crosbie J, Dupuis A, et al. Clinical Correlates of Hoarding With and Without Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in a Community Pediatric Sample. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2016;55(2):114-21.e2.
    Burton, C. L., Crosbie, J., Dupuis, A., Mathews, C. A., Soreni, N., Schachar, R., & Arnold, P. D. (2016). Clinical Correlates of Hoarding With and Without Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in a Community Pediatric Sample. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 55(2), pp. 114-21.e2. doi:10.1016/j.jaac.2015.11.014.
    Burton CL, et al. Clinical Correlates of Hoarding With and Without Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in a Community Pediatric Sample. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2016;55(2):114-21.e2. PubMed PMID: 26802778.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical Correlates of Hoarding With and Without Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in a Community Pediatric Sample. AU - Burton,Christie L, AU - Crosbie,Jennifer, AU - Dupuis,Annie, AU - Mathews,Carol A, AU - Soreni,Noam, AU - Schachar,Russell, AU - Arnold,Paul D, Y1 - 2015/12/02/ PY - 2015/08/14/received PY - 2015/11/06/revised PY - 2015/11/20/accepted PY - 2016/1/24/entrez PY - 2016/1/24/pubmed PY - 2017/2/6/medline KW - attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder KW - child and adolescent KW - community sample KW - hoarding KW - obsessive-compulsive disorder SP - 114 EP - 21.e2 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry JO - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry VL - 55 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We assessed the prevalence and clinical correlates of hoarding, with and without obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms, in a community-based pediatric sample. METHOD: We measured hoarding and OC symptoms using the Toronto Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (TOCS) in 16,718 youth aged 6 to 17 years in the community. We classified participants with high and low symptom counts for hoarding and OC into 4 groups: hoarding+OC; hoarding-only; OC-only; and control (no OC or hoarding symptoms). We compared these 4 groups on parent- or self-reported medical and psychiatric conditions, anxiety symptoms measured with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms measured with the Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal Behavior Scale (SWAN). RESULTS: Almost 10% of participants were in the high hoarding group. Of these participants, 40% did not fall into the high OC group. The prevalence of reported psychiatric disorders (e.g., ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder) was greater in the hoarding (hoarding+OC and hoarding-only) and OC groups (hoarding+OC and OC-only) than in the nonhoarding (OC-only and control) and non-OC groups (hoarding-only and control), respectively. ADHD, specifically inattentive, symptoms were more common in the hoarding-only than in the OC-only group while anxiety symptoms were more common in the OC-only than in the hoarding-only group. CONCLUSION: In a community pediatric sample, hoarding symptoms occurred in both the presence and absence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Hoarding symptoms alone had some unique clinical correlates, in particular, more inattentive ADHD symptoms and fewer anxiety symptoms. These findings suggest that hoarding is distinct from OC traits in youth. SN - 1527-5418 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26802778/Clinical_Correlates_of_Hoarding_With_and_Without_Comorbid_Obsessive_Compulsive_Symptoms_in_a_Community_Pediatric_Sample_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0890-8567(15)00793-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -