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Bilateral Pallidotomy for Cervical Dystonia After Failed Selective Peripheral Denervation.
World Neurosurg. 2016 May; 89:728.e1-4.WN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We investigated the utility of pallidotomy for cervical dystonia after failed selective peripheral denervation.

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 36-year-old man presented with cervical dystonia with limited range of motion of the left shoulder, particularly in abduction. His Tsui score was 8. Owing to the ineffectiveness of botulinum toxin injection, he underwent selective peripheral denervation with an unsatisfactory outcome, with a postoperative Tsui score of 6. Simultaneous bilateral pallidotomy was performed with local anesthesia 1 year after the initial surgery. The day after the pallidotomy, all dystonic symptoms were markedly improved except for the limited range of shoulder abduction. The Tsui score recorded 1 week after the pallidotomy was 1. Transient aggressive behavior was the only postoperative complication. During clinical follow-up period of 1 year, no recurrence of the symptoms was observed.

CONCLUSIONS

Pallidotomy represents a feasible and effective treatment for cervical dystonia refractory to selective peripheral denervation without hardware-related complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Neurosurgery, Kumamoto Takumadai Rehabilitation Hospital, Kumamoto, Japan.Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: ttaira@nij.twmu.ac.jp.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26802868

Citation

Horisawa, Shiro, et al. "Bilateral Pallidotomy for Cervical Dystonia After Failed Selective Peripheral Denervation." World Neurosurgery, vol. 89, 2016, pp. 728.e1-4.
Horisawa S, Goto S, Takeda N, et al. Bilateral Pallidotomy for Cervical Dystonia After Failed Selective Peripheral Denervation. World Neurosurg. 2016;89:728.e1-4.
Horisawa, S., Goto, S., Takeda, N., Terashima, H., Kawamata, T., & Taira, T. (2016). Bilateral Pallidotomy for Cervical Dystonia After Failed Selective Peripheral Denervation. World Neurosurgery, 89, e1-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2016.01.011
Horisawa S, et al. Bilateral Pallidotomy for Cervical Dystonia After Failed Selective Peripheral Denervation. World Neurosurg. 2016;89:728.e1-4. PubMed PMID: 26802868.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bilateral Pallidotomy for Cervical Dystonia After Failed Selective Peripheral Denervation. AU - Horisawa,Shiro, AU - Goto,Shinichi, AU - Takeda,Nobuhiko, AU - Terashima,Hanae, AU - Kawamata,Takakazu, AU - Taira,Takaomi, Y1 - 2016/01/21/ PY - 2015/08/23/received PY - 2016/01/08/revised PY - 2016/01/11/accepted PY - 2016/1/24/entrez PY - 2016/1/24/pubmed PY - 2017/8/26/medline KW - Cervical dystonia KW - Deep brain stimulation KW - Pallidotomy KW - Selective peripheral denervation SP - 728.e1 EP - 4 JF - World neurosurgery JO - World Neurosurg VL - 89 N2 - BACKGROUND: We investigated the utility of pallidotomy for cervical dystonia after failed selective peripheral denervation. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 36-year-old man presented with cervical dystonia with limited range of motion of the left shoulder, particularly in abduction. His Tsui score was 8. Owing to the ineffectiveness of botulinum toxin injection, he underwent selective peripheral denervation with an unsatisfactory outcome, with a postoperative Tsui score of 6. Simultaneous bilateral pallidotomy was performed with local anesthesia 1 year after the initial surgery. The day after the pallidotomy, all dystonic symptoms were markedly improved except for the limited range of shoulder abduction. The Tsui score recorded 1 week after the pallidotomy was 1. Transient aggressive behavior was the only postoperative complication. During clinical follow-up period of 1 year, no recurrence of the symptoms was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Pallidotomy represents a feasible and effective treatment for cervical dystonia refractory to selective peripheral denervation without hardware-related complications. SN - 1878-8769 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26802868/Bilateral_Pallidotomy_for_Cervical_Dystonia_After_Failed_Selective_Peripheral_Denervation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1878-8750(16)00090-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -