Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Metabolic syndrome does not always play a critical role in decreased GFR.
Ren Fail. 2016; 38(3):383-9.RF

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is a paucity of literature available as to the relationship between different levels of each metabolic syndrome (MetS) component and decreased GFR. In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate whether MetS always plays a critical role in decreased GFR.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study was conducted between February 2010 and September 2012, with 75,468 adults enrolled undergoing measurements of blood pressure as well as tests of blood and urine samples. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and the chi-square test was used for categorical variables and described as a percentage.

RESULTS

Of the 75,468 participants, 350 (0.5%) subjects met criteria for the decreased GFR, with a mean age of 48.79 ± 13.76 years. After adjustment for age, diastolic blood pressure and high-density lipoprotein were inversely related to decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in multivariable analyses, with an OR (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.39-0.84) and 0.41 (0.24-0.72), respectively. The prevalence rate of CKD in critical group was 0.73% (154 of 21,127) and 0% (0 of 370) in noncritical group. In analysis stratified by the type of MetS components, the differences in noncritical group and the reference group were not statistically significant (χ(2)=()1.349, p > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

MetS does not always play a critical role in decreased GFR, with different levels of individual components of MetS exerting idiosyncratic effects in decreased eGFR. In fact, patients with abnormal body mass index, high triglycerides, and elevated fasting plasma glucose would not have impact on decreased GFR.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health , Xuzhou Medical College , Xuzhou , Jiangsu , China ;b Division of Nephrology , Xuzhou Central Hospital , Xuzhou , Jiangsu , China ;a Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health , Xuzhou Medical College , Xuzhou , Jiangsu , China ;c School of Basic Medical Sciences , Xinxiang Medical University , Xinxiang , Henan , China.a Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health , Xuzhou Medical College , Xuzhou , Jiangsu , China ;a Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health , Xuzhou Medical College , Xuzhou , Jiangsu , China ;a Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health , Xuzhou Medical College , Xuzhou , Jiangsu , China ;

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26804106

Citation

Cai, Qingqing, et al. "Metabolic Syndrome Does Not Always Play a Critical Role in Decreased GFR." Renal Failure, vol. 38, no. 3, 2016, pp. 383-9.
Cai Q, Wang X, Ye J, et al. Metabolic syndrome does not always play a critical role in decreased GFR. Ren Fail. 2016;38(3):383-9.
Cai, Q., Wang, X., Ye, J., Zhuo, L., Song, H., Liu, C., & Zhuo, L. (2016). Metabolic syndrome does not always play a critical role in decreased GFR. Renal Failure, 38(3), 383-9. https://doi.org/10.3109/0886022X.2015.1136873
Cai Q, et al. Metabolic Syndrome Does Not Always Play a Critical Role in Decreased GFR. Ren Fail. 2016;38(3):383-9. PubMed PMID: 26804106.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic syndrome does not always play a critical role in decreased GFR. AU - Cai,Qingqing, AU - Wang,Xiuying, AU - Ye,Jingtao, AU - Zhuo,Lin, AU - Song,Hui, AU - Liu,Chen, AU - Zhuo,Lang, Y1 - 2016/01/24/ PY - 2016/1/26/entrez PY - 2016/1/26/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - Chronic kidney disease KW - critical role KW - different levels KW - metabolic syndrome SP - 383 EP - 9 JF - Renal failure JO - Ren Fail VL - 38 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of literature available as to the relationship between different levels of each metabolic syndrome (MetS) component and decreased GFR. In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate whether MetS always plays a critical role in decreased GFR. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted between February 2010 and September 2012, with 75,468 adults enrolled undergoing measurements of blood pressure as well as tests of blood and urine samples. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and the chi-square test was used for categorical variables and described as a percentage. RESULTS: Of the 75,468 participants, 350 (0.5%) subjects met criteria for the decreased GFR, with a mean age of 48.79 ± 13.76 years. After adjustment for age, diastolic blood pressure and high-density lipoprotein were inversely related to decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in multivariable analyses, with an OR (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.39-0.84) and 0.41 (0.24-0.72), respectively. The prevalence rate of CKD in critical group was 0.73% (154 of 21,127) and 0% (0 of 370) in noncritical group. In analysis stratified by the type of MetS components, the differences in noncritical group and the reference group were not statistically significant (χ(2)=()1.349, p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: MetS does not always play a critical role in decreased GFR, with different levels of individual components of MetS exerting idiosyncratic effects in decreased eGFR. In fact, patients with abnormal body mass index, high triglycerides, and elevated fasting plasma glucose would not have impact on decreased GFR. SN - 1525-6049 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26804106/Metabolic_syndrome_does_not_always_play_a_critical_role_in_decreased_GFR_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/0886022X.2015.1136873 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -