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Mepiquat: A Process-Induced Byproduct in Roasted Cereal-Based Foodstuffs.
J Agric Food Chem. 2016 Feb 10; 64(5):1185-90.JA

Abstract

Mepiquat, a growth regulator widely used in agriculture, is also known as a process-induced byproduct formed in coffee from natural constituents during heat treatments such as roasting. This study examines mepiquat formation in cereal-based foodstuffs treated at sufficiently high temperature to trigger methyl transfer reactions that involve glycine betaine and choline naturally present in cereals. Color measurements of roasted barley grains revealed a correlation between thermal treatment and mepiquat content. Trials at industrial scale on instant beverages composed of roasted cereals demonstrated significant increases in mepiquat during the thermal process (in the range of 140-205 μg/kg in final products). A targeted survey of commercial products showed mepiquat in the range 69-381 μg/kg in powdered cereal instant drinks and 42-168 μg/kg in mugicha tea, a roasted barley infusion. These findings will not significantly affect the exposure of consumers to mepiquat due to the low amounts detected.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nestlé Research Center , Vers-Chez-Les-Blanc, 1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland.Nestlé Research Center , Vers-Chez-Les-Blanc, 1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland.Nestlé Corporate Quality Management , Avenue Nestlé 55, 1800 Vevey, Switzerland.Nestle Quality Assurance Centre , Menningerstrasse 1, 84570 Polling, Germany.Nestle Quality Assurance Centre , Menningerstrasse 1, 84570 Polling, Germany.Nestlé Product Technology Center Orbe , 1350 Orbe, Switzerland.Nestlé Product Technology Center Orbe , 1350 Orbe, Switzerland.Nestlé Research Center , Vers-Chez-Les-Blanc, 1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26805918

Citation

Bessaire, Thomas, et al. "Mepiquat: a Process-Induced Byproduct in Roasted Cereal-Based Foodstuffs." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 64, no. 5, 2016, pp. 1185-90.
Bessaire T, Tarres A, Stadler RH, et al. Mepiquat: A Process-Induced Byproduct in Roasted Cereal-Based Foodstuffs. J Agric Food Chem. 2016;64(5):1185-90.
Bessaire, T., Tarres, A., Stadler, R. H., Wermann, S., Hofmann, J., Theurillat, V., Combremont, R., & Delatour, T. (2016). Mepiquat: A Process-Induced Byproduct in Roasted Cereal-Based Foodstuffs. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 64(5), 1185-90. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.5b05418
Bessaire T, et al. Mepiquat: a Process-Induced Byproduct in Roasted Cereal-Based Foodstuffs. J Agric Food Chem. 2016 Feb 10;64(5):1185-90. PubMed PMID: 26805918.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mepiquat: A Process-Induced Byproduct in Roasted Cereal-Based Foodstuffs. AU - Bessaire,Thomas, AU - Tarres,Adrienne, AU - Stadler,Richard H, AU - Wermann,Silke, AU - Hofmann,Jocelyne, AU - Theurillat,Viviane, AU - Combremont,Raphaël, AU - Delatour,Thierry, Y1 - 2016/02/01/ PY - 2016/1/26/entrez PY - 2016/1/26/pubmed PY - 2016/10/8/medline KW - cereals KW - choline KW - glycine betaine KW - mepiquat KW - roasted food KW - thermal treatment SP - 1185 EP - 90 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 64 IS - 5 N2 - Mepiquat, a growth regulator widely used in agriculture, is also known as a process-induced byproduct formed in coffee from natural constituents during heat treatments such as roasting. This study examines mepiquat formation in cereal-based foodstuffs treated at sufficiently high temperature to trigger methyl transfer reactions that involve glycine betaine and choline naturally present in cereals. Color measurements of roasted barley grains revealed a correlation between thermal treatment and mepiquat content. Trials at industrial scale on instant beverages composed of roasted cereals demonstrated significant increases in mepiquat during the thermal process (in the range of 140-205 μg/kg in final products). A targeted survey of commercial products showed mepiquat in the range 69-381 μg/kg in powdered cereal instant drinks and 42-168 μg/kg in mugicha tea, a roasted barley infusion. These findings will not significantly affect the exposure of consumers to mepiquat due to the low amounts detected. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26805918/Mepiquat:_A_Process_Induced_Byproduct_in_Roasted_Cereal_Based_Foodstuffs_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.5b05418 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -