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Nauclea officinalis inhibits inflammation in LPS-mediated RAW 264.7 macrophages by suppressing the NF-κB signaling pathway.
J Ethnopharmacol. 2016 May 13; 183:159-165.JE

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE

Nauclea officinalis has been traditionally used in China for the treatment of fever, pneumonia and enteritidis etc. This study aims to investigate effects of N. officinalis on the inflammatory response as well as the possible molecular mechanism in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Anti-inflammatory activity of N. officinalis (10, 20, 50, and 100µg/mL) was investigated by using LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. The NO production was determined by assaying nitrite in culture supernatants with the Griess reagent. The levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in culture media were measured with ELISA kits. Real time fluorescence quantitative PCR was detected for mRNA expression of iNOS, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. Western blot assay was performed to illustrate the inhibitory effects of N. officinalis on phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65.

RESULTS

Treatment with N. officinalis (10-100µg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited the production as well as mRNA expression of NO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Western blot assay suggested that the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect was associated with the inhibition of phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65.

CONCLUSIONS

The results indicated that N. officinalis potentially inhibited the activation of upstream mediator NF-κB signaling pathway via suppressing phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65 to inhibit LPS-stimulated inflammation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Affiliated Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China; Jiangsu Province Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China; Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009, PR China.College of Pharmacy, Hainan Medical University, Haikou 570102, PR China.Affiliated Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China; Jiangsu Province Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China.Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009, PR China.Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Design & Optimization, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009, PR China.Affiliated Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China; Jiangsu Province Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China.Affiliated Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China; Jiangsu Province Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China.Affiliated Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China; Jiangsu Province Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China.Affiliated Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China; Jiangsu Province Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China.Affiliated Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China; Jiangsu Province Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China.Affiliated Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China; Jiangsu Province Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210028, PR China. Electronic address: zfxcjq@126.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26806575

Citation

Zhai, Xiao-Ting, et al. "Nauclea Officinalis Inhibits Inflammation in LPS-mediated RAW 264.7 Macrophages By Suppressing the NF-κB Signaling Pathway." Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 183, 2016, pp. 159-165.
Zhai XT, Zhang ZY, Jiang CH, et al. Nauclea officinalis inhibits inflammation in LPS-mediated RAW 264.7 macrophages by suppressing the NF-κB signaling pathway. J Ethnopharmacol. 2016;183:159-165.
Zhai, X. T., Zhang, Z. Y., Jiang, C. H., Chen, J. Q., Ye, J. Q., Jia, X. B., Yang, Y., Ni, Q., Wang, S. X., Song, J., & Zhu, F. X. (2016). Nauclea officinalis inhibits inflammation in LPS-mediated RAW 264.7 macrophages by suppressing the NF-κB signaling pathway. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 183, 159-165. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2016.01.018
Zhai XT, et al. Nauclea Officinalis Inhibits Inflammation in LPS-mediated RAW 264.7 Macrophages By Suppressing the NF-κB Signaling Pathway. J Ethnopharmacol. 2016 May 13;183:159-165. PubMed PMID: 26806575.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nauclea officinalis inhibits inflammation in LPS-mediated RAW 264.7 macrophages by suppressing the NF-κB signaling pathway. AU - Zhai,Xiao-Ting, AU - Zhang,Zhi-Yuan, AU - Jiang,Cui-Hua, AU - Chen,Jia-Quan, AU - Ye,Ji-Qing, AU - Jia,Xiao-Bin, AU - Yang,Yi, AU - Ni,Qian, AU - Wang,Shu-Xia, AU - Song,Jie, AU - Zhu,Fen-Xia, Y1 - 2016/01/19/ PY - 2015/07/10/received PY - 2016/01/14/revised PY - 2016/01/18/accepted PY - 2016/1/26/entrez PY - 2016/1/26/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide KW - 3-epi-pumiloside (CAS no: 126722-26-7) KW - Acetonitrile (PubChem CID: 6342) KW - Anti-inflammation KW - DMSO (PubChem CID: 679) KW - EtOH (PubChem CID: 702) KW - Methanoic acid (PubChem CID: 284) KW - NF-κB KW - NaNO(2) (PubChem CID: 23668193) KW - Nauclea officinalis KW - Pro-inflammatory cytokines KW - Pumiloside (PubChem CID: 10346314) KW - Strictosamide (PubChem CID: 11969629) KW - Vincosamide (PubChem CID: 44567197) SP - 159 EP - 165 JF - Journal of ethnopharmacology JO - J Ethnopharmacol VL - 183 N2 - ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Nauclea officinalis has been traditionally used in China for the treatment of fever, pneumonia and enteritidis etc. This study aims to investigate effects of N. officinalis on the inflammatory response as well as the possible molecular mechanism in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Anti-inflammatory activity of N. officinalis (10, 20, 50, and 100µg/mL) was investigated by using LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. The NO production was determined by assaying nitrite in culture supernatants with the Griess reagent. The levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in culture media were measured with ELISA kits. Real time fluorescence quantitative PCR was detected for mRNA expression of iNOS, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. Western blot assay was performed to illustrate the inhibitory effects of N. officinalis on phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65. RESULTS: Treatment with N. officinalis (10-100µg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited the production as well as mRNA expression of NO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Western blot assay suggested that the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect was associated with the inhibition of phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicated that N. officinalis potentially inhibited the activation of upstream mediator NF-κB signaling pathway via suppressing phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65 to inhibit LPS-stimulated inflammation. SN - 1872-7573 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26806575/Nauclea_officinalis_inhibits_inflammation_in_LPS_mediated_RAW_264_7_macrophages_by_suppressing_the_NF_κB_signaling_pathway_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-8741(16)30019-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -