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Anthropometry-based Obesity Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: A Large Prospective Cohort Study in Norway.
Epidemiology 2016; 27(3):423-32E

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is unclear whether obesity phenotypes measured by different anthropometric indices are associated with a risk of colorectal adenocarcinoma by anatomical location.

METHODS

We compiled harmonized population-based cohort studies (Cohort of Norway, CONOR) with 143,477 participants that were conducted between 1994 and 2010. General, abdominal, and gluteofemoral obesity were assessed by body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)), waist circumference (cm), and hip circumference (cm). Other measures examined were waist to hip ratio, waist to height ratio, and body adiposity index. We performed Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of obesity relative to a risk of colorectal adenocarcinoma.

RESULTS

In total, 2,044 incident cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma were identified. We observed a positive association between waist circumference (high versus low) and adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.5, 2.5) and distal colon (HR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.3, 2.3) when adjusted for BMI. The association with waist circumference was especially strong in men. BMI was not associated with adenocarcinoma in the colon or rectum after adjusting for waist circumference. We found no association between hip circumference and colorectal adenocarcinoma. When adjusted for BMI plus waist circumference, body adiposity index was negatively associated with adenocarcinoma in the proximal or distal colon.

CONCLUSION

Abdominal obesity, but not general or gluteofemoral obesity, was associated with an increased risk of adenocarcinoma in the proximal and the distal colon, especially in men. Muscularity may be negatively associated with risk of colon adenocarcinoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the aDepartment of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; bDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; and cHUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Healthand General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26808598

Citation

Lu, Yunxia, et al. "Anthropometry-based Obesity Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: a Large Prospective Cohort Study in Norway." Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), vol. 27, no. 3, 2016, pp. 423-32.
Lu Y, Ness-Jensen E, Martling A, et al. Anthropometry-based Obesity Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: A Large Prospective Cohort Study in Norway. Epidemiology. 2016;27(3):423-32.
Lu, Y., Ness-Jensen, E., Martling, A., & Hveem, K. (2016). Anthropometry-based Obesity Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: A Large Prospective Cohort Study in Norway. Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), 27(3), pp. 423-32. doi:10.1097/EDE.0000000000000447.
Lu Y, et al. Anthropometry-based Obesity Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: a Large Prospective Cohort Study in Norway. Epidemiology. 2016;27(3):423-32. PubMed PMID: 26808598.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anthropometry-based Obesity Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: A Large Prospective Cohort Study in Norway. AU - Lu,Yunxia, AU - Ness-Jensen,Eivind, AU - Martling,Anna, AU - Hveem,Kristian, PY - 2016/1/26/entrez PY - 2016/1/26/pubmed PY - 2017/1/6/medline SP - 423 EP - 32 JF - Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) JO - Epidemiology VL - 27 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether obesity phenotypes measured by different anthropometric indices are associated with a risk of colorectal adenocarcinoma by anatomical location. METHODS: We compiled harmonized population-based cohort studies (Cohort of Norway, CONOR) with 143,477 participants that were conducted between 1994 and 2010. General, abdominal, and gluteofemoral obesity were assessed by body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)), waist circumference (cm), and hip circumference (cm). Other measures examined were waist to hip ratio, waist to height ratio, and body adiposity index. We performed Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of obesity relative to a risk of colorectal adenocarcinoma. RESULTS: In total, 2,044 incident cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma were identified. We observed a positive association between waist circumference (high versus low) and adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.5, 2.5) and distal colon (HR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.3, 2.3) when adjusted for BMI. The association with waist circumference was especially strong in men. BMI was not associated with adenocarcinoma in the colon or rectum after adjusting for waist circumference. We found no association between hip circumference and colorectal adenocarcinoma. When adjusted for BMI plus waist circumference, body adiposity index was negatively associated with adenocarcinoma in the proximal or distal colon. CONCLUSION: Abdominal obesity, but not general or gluteofemoral obesity, was associated with an increased risk of adenocarcinoma in the proximal and the distal colon, especially in men. Muscularity may be negatively associated with risk of colon adenocarcinoma. SN - 1531-5487 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26808598/Anthropometry_based_Obesity_Phenotypes_and_Risk_of_Colorectal_Adenocarcinoma:_A_Large_Prospective_Cohort_Study_in_Norway_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=26808598 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -