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Ethical and cultural striving: Lived experiences of minority nurses in dementia care.
Nurs Ethics. 2017 Sep; 24(6):752-766.NE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nursing workforce in Western European health institutions has become more diverse because of immigration and recruitment from Asian, African, and East-European countries. Minority healthcare providers may experience communication problems in interaction with patients and coworkers, and they are likely to experience conflict or uncertainty when confronted with different cultural traditions and values. Persons with dementia are a vulnerable group, and the consequences of their illness challenge the ability to understand and express oneself verbally. The large number of minority healthcare providers in nursing homes underlines the importance to obtain better knowledge about this group's experiences with the care challenges in dementia care units.

RESEARCH QUESTION

Can you tell about any challenges in the experiences in the encounter with persons suffering from dementia? Participants and research context: Five minority healthcare providers in a nursing home, in a dementia unit. All guidelines for research ethic were followed. Ethical consideration: The participants were informed that participation was voluntary, and they were guarantied anonymity.

METHOD

We used a qualitative method, conducting individual interviews, using a narrative approach. In the analysis, we applied a phenomenological-hermeneutical method, developed for researching life experiences.

FINDINGS

One theme and four subthemes: striving to understand the quality of care for persons with dementia. The subthemes: sensitivity to understand the patients' verbal and nonverbal expressions. To understand gratefulness, understand the patient as an adult and autonomous person, and understand the patient as a patient in a nursing home. Challenges comprise both ethical and cultural striving to understand persons with dementia.

CONCLUSION

To care for persons with dementia in an unfamiliar context may be understood as a striving for acting ethically, when at the same time striving to adapt and acculturate to new cultural norms, in order to practice good dementia care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oslo and Akershus University College, Norway.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableLovisenberg Diaconal University College, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26811401

Citation

Egede-Nissen, Veslemøy, et al. "Ethical and Cultural Striving: Lived Experiences of Minority Nurses in Dementia Care." Nursing Ethics, vol. 24, no. 6, 2017, pp. 752-766.
Egede-Nissen V, Sellevold GS, Jakobsen R, et al. Ethical and cultural striving: Lived experiences of minority nurses in dementia care. Nurs Ethics. 2017;24(6):752-766.
Egede-Nissen, V., Sellevold, G. S., Jakobsen, R., & Sørlie, V. (2017). Ethical and cultural striving: Lived experiences of minority nurses in dementia care. Nursing Ethics, 24(6), 752-766. https://doi.org/10.1177/0969733015624489
Egede-Nissen V, et al. Ethical and Cultural Striving: Lived Experiences of Minority Nurses in Dementia Care. Nurs Ethics. 2017;24(6):752-766. PubMed PMID: 26811401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ethical and cultural striving: Lived experiences of minority nurses in dementia care. AU - Egede-Nissen,Veslemøy, AU - Sellevold,Gerd Sylvi, AU - Jakobsen,Rita, AU - Sørlie,Venke, Y1 - 2016/01/24/ PY - 2016/1/27/pubmed PY - 2017/11/3/medline PY - 2016/1/27/entrez KW - Acculturation KW - dementia unit KW - ethics of care KW - minority nurses KW - phenomenological hermeneutic SP - 752 EP - 766 JF - Nursing ethics JO - Nurs Ethics VL - 24 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nursing workforce in Western European health institutions has become more diverse because of immigration and recruitment from Asian, African, and East-European countries. Minority healthcare providers may experience communication problems in interaction with patients and coworkers, and they are likely to experience conflict or uncertainty when confronted with different cultural traditions and values. Persons with dementia are a vulnerable group, and the consequences of their illness challenge the ability to understand and express oneself verbally. The large number of minority healthcare providers in nursing homes underlines the importance to obtain better knowledge about this group's experiences with the care challenges in dementia care units. RESEARCH QUESTION: Can you tell about any challenges in the experiences in the encounter with persons suffering from dementia? Participants and research context: Five minority healthcare providers in a nursing home, in a dementia unit. All guidelines for research ethic were followed. Ethical consideration: The participants were informed that participation was voluntary, and they were guarantied anonymity. METHOD: We used a qualitative method, conducting individual interviews, using a narrative approach. In the analysis, we applied a phenomenological-hermeneutical method, developed for researching life experiences. FINDINGS: One theme and four subthemes: striving to understand the quality of care for persons with dementia. The subthemes: sensitivity to understand the patients' verbal and nonverbal expressions. To understand gratefulness, understand the patient as an adult and autonomous person, and understand the patient as a patient in a nursing home. Challenges comprise both ethical and cultural striving to understand persons with dementia. CONCLUSION: To care for persons with dementia in an unfamiliar context may be understood as a striving for acting ethically, when at the same time striving to adapt and acculturate to new cultural norms, in order to practice good dementia care. SN - 1477-0989 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26811401/Ethical_and_cultural_striving:_Lived_experiences_of_minority_nurses_in_dementia_care_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0969733015624489?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -