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Molecular Composition and Volatility of Organic Aerosol in the Southeastern U.S.: Implications for IEPOX Derived SOA.
Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Mar 01; 50(5):2200-9.ES

Abstract

We present measurements as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) during which atmospheric aerosol particles were comprehensively characterized. We present results utilizing a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsol coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). We focus on the volatility and composition of isoprene derived organic aerosol tracers and of the bulk organic aerosol. By utilizing the online volatility and molecular composition information provided by the FIGAERO-CIMS, we show that the vast majority of commonly reported molecular tracers of isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is derived from thermal decomposition of accretion products or other low volatility organics having effective saturation vapor concentrations <10(-3) μg m(-3). In addition, while accounting for up to 30% of total submicrometer organic aerosol mass, the IEPOX-derived SOA has a higher volatility than the remaining bulk. That IEPOX-SOA, and more generally bulk organic aerosol in the Southeastern U.S. is comprised of effectively nonvolatile material has important implications for modeling SOA derived from isoprene, and for mechanistic interpretations of molecular tracer measurements. Our results show that partitioning theory performs well for 2-methyltetrols, once accretion product decomposition is taken into account. No significant partitioning delays due to aerosol phase or viscosity are observed, and no partitioning to particle-phase water or other unexplained mechanisms are needed to explain our results.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington , Seattle, Washington 98195, United States.Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington , Seattle, Washington 98195, United States.Department of Chemistry, University of Washington , Seattle, Washington 98195, United States.Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg , 41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516, United States.Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington , Seattle, Washington 98195, United States.Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki , Helsinki, Finland.Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516, United States.Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516, United States.Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516, United States.Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington , Seattle, Washington 98195, United States.Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki , Helsinki, Finland.Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado , Boulder, Colorado 80309, United States. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado , Boulder, Colorado 80309, United States.Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado , Boulder, Colorado 80309, United States. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado , Boulder, Colorado 80309, United States.Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg , 41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington , Seattle, Washington 98195, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26811969

Citation

Lopez-Hilfiker, F D., et al. "Molecular Composition and Volatility of Organic Aerosol in the Southeastern U.S.: Implications for IEPOX Derived SOA." Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 50, no. 5, 2016, pp. 2200-9.
Lopez-Hilfiker FD, Mohr C, D'Ambro EL, et al. Molecular Composition and Volatility of Organic Aerosol in the Southeastern U.S.: Implications for IEPOX Derived SOA. Environ Sci Technol. 2016;50(5):2200-9.
Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D., Mohr, C., D'Ambro, E. L., Lutz, A., Riedel, T. P., Gaston, C. J., Iyer, S., Zhang, Z., Gold, A., Surratt, J. D., Lee, B. H., Kurten, T., Hu, W. W., Jimenez, J., Hallquist, M., & Thornton, J. A. (2016). Molecular Composition and Volatility of Organic Aerosol in the Southeastern U.S.: Implications for IEPOX Derived SOA. Environmental Science & Technology, 50(5), 2200-9. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b04769
Lopez-Hilfiker FD, et al. Molecular Composition and Volatility of Organic Aerosol in the Southeastern U.S.: Implications for IEPOX Derived SOA. Environ Sci Technol. 2016 Mar 1;50(5):2200-9. PubMed PMID: 26811969.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Molecular Composition and Volatility of Organic Aerosol in the Southeastern U.S.: Implications for IEPOX Derived SOA. AU - Lopez-Hilfiker,F D, AU - Mohr,C, AU - D'Ambro,E L, AU - Lutz,A, AU - Riedel,T P, AU - Gaston,C J, AU - Iyer,S, AU - Zhang,Z, AU - Gold,A, AU - Surratt,J D, AU - Lee,B H, AU - Kurten,T, AU - Hu,W W, AU - Jimenez,J, AU - Hallquist,M, AU - Thornton,J A, Y1 - 2016/02/09/ PY - 2016/1/27/entrez PY - 2016/1/27/pubmed PY - 2016/11/1/medline SP - 2200 EP - 9 JF - Environmental science & technology JO - Environ Sci Technol VL - 50 IS - 5 N2 - We present measurements as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) during which atmospheric aerosol particles were comprehensively characterized. We present results utilizing a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsol coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). We focus on the volatility and composition of isoprene derived organic aerosol tracers and of the bulk organic aerosol. By utilizing the online volatility and molecular composition information provided by the FIGAERO-CIMS, we show that the vast majority of commonly reported molecular tracers of isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is derived from thermal decomposition of accretion products or other low volatility organics having effective saturation vapor concentrations <10(-3) μg m(-3). In addition, while accounting for up to 30% of total submicrometer organic aerosol mass, the IEPOX-derived SOA has a higher volatility than the remaining bulk. That IEPOX-SOA, and more generally bulk organic aerosol in the Southeastern U.S. is comprised of effectively nonvolatile material has important implications for modeling SOA derived from isoprene, and for mechanistic interpretations of molecular tracer measurements. Our results show that partitioning theory performs well for 2-methyltetrols, once accretion product decomposition is taken into account. No significant partitioning delays due to aerosol phase or viscosity are observed, and no partitioning to particle-phase water or other unexplained mechanisms are needed to explain our results. SN - 1520-5851 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26811969/Molecular_Composition_and_Volatility_of_Organic_Aerosol_in_the_Southeastern_U_S_:_Implications_for_IEPOX_Derived_SOA_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b04769 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -