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Calcium intake and urinary stone disease.

Abstract

Calcium homeostasis is a complicated and incompletely understood process that is primarily regulated through an interaction between the intestines, kidneys, and bones. Intestinal calcium absorption is determined by many factors including the amount of regular calcium intake, as well as vitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels. Intestinal calcium absorption is likely different between stone formers and non-stone formers, with higher levels of calcium absorption in those with a history of stones independent of their calcium intake. We no longer recommend dietary calcium restriction as this may lead to bone demineralization and an increase in stone formation. Practitioners need to continue to educate patients to maintain moderate dietary calcium intake. The effect of calcium supplementation on stone formation is currently controversial. It is likely that large doses of supplemental calcium, especially if taken separate from a meal, may lead to stone formation. When necessary, stone forming patients should be encouraged to take their calcium supplements with a meal and their stone disease should be monitored.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Department of Urology, Urological Research Outcomes Collaboration, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.

    Source

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26816771

    Citation

    Sorensen, Mathew D.. "Calcium Intake and Urinary Stone Disease." Translational Andrology and Urology, vol. 3, no. 3, 2014, pp. 235-40.
    Sorensen MD. Calcium intake and urinary stone disease. Transl Androl Urol. 2014;3(3):235-40.
    Sorensen, M. D. (2014). Calcium intake and urinary stone disease. Translational Andrology and Urology, 3(3), pp. 235-40. doi:10.3978/j.issn.2223-4683.2014.06.05.
    Sorensen MD. Calcium Intake and Urinary Stone Disease. Transl Androl Urol. 2014;3(3):235-40. PubMed PMID: 26816771.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Calcium intake and urinary stone disease. A1 - Sorensen,Mathew D, PY - 2016/1/28/entrez PY - 2014/9/1/pubmed PY - 2014/9/1/medline KW - Intestinal calcium absorption KW - calcium supplementation KW - dietary calcium intake KW - hypercalciuria KW - kidney stones KW - nephrolithiasis SP - 235 EP - 40 JF - Translational andrology and urology JO - Transl Androl Urol VL - 3 IS - 3 N2 - Calcium homeostasis is a complicated and incompletely understood process that is primarily regulated through an interaction between the intestines, kidneys, and bones. Intestinal calcium absorption is determined by many factors including the amount of regular calcium intake, as well as vitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels. Intestinal calcium absorption is likely different between stone formers and non-stone formers, with higher levels of calcium absorption in those with a history of stones independent of their calcium intake. We no longer recommend dietary calcium restriction as this may lead to bone demineralization and an increase in stone formation. Practitioners need to continue to educate patients to maintain moderate dietary calcium intake. The effect of calcium supplementation on stone formation is currently controversial. It is likely that large doses of supplemental calcium, especially if taken separate from a meal, may lead to stone formation. When necessary, stone forming patients should be encouraged to take their calcium supplements with a meal and their stone disease should be monitored. SN - 2223-4691 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26816771/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3978/j.issn.2223-4683.2014.06.05 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -