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Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, 2016.

Abstract

CDC has developed interim guidelines for health care providers in the United States who are caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy. These guidelines include recommendations for the testing and management of these infants. Guidance is subject to change as more information becomes available; the latest information, including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online (http://www.cdc.gov/zika). Pediatric health care providers should work closely with obstetric providers to identify infants whose mothers were potentially infected with Zika virus during pregnancy (based on travel to or residence in an area with Zika virus transmission [http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices]), and review fetal ultrasounds and maternal testing for Zika virus infection (see Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak*) (1). Zika virus testing is recommended for 1) infants with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications born to women who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission while pregnant; or 2) infants born to mothers with positive or inconclusive test results for Zika virus infection. For infants with laboratory evidence of a possible congenital Zika virus infection, additional clinical evaluation and follow-up is recommended. Health care providers should contact their state or territorial health department to facilitate testing. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition.

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  • Authors

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    Source

    MeSH

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
    Female
    Humans
    Infant
    Practice Guidelines as Topic
    Pregnancy
    Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
    United States
    Zika Virus Infection

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26820387

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Interim Guidelines for the Evaluation and Testing of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, 2016. AU - Staples,J Erin, AU - Dziuban,Eric J, AU - Fischer,Marc, AU - Cragan,Janet D, AU - Rasmussen,Sonja A, AU - Cannon,Michael J, AU - Frey,Meghan T, AU - Renquist,Christina M, AU - Lanciotti,Robert S, AU - Muñoz,Jorge L, AU - Powers,Ann M, AU - Honein,Margaret A, AU - Moore,Cynthia A, Y1 - 2016/01/29/ PY - 2016/1/29/entrez PY - 2016/1/29/pubmed PY - 2016/6/1/medline SP - 63 EP - 7 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. VL - 65 IS - 3 N2 - CDC has developed interim guidelines for health care providers in the United States who are caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy. These guidelines include recommendations for the testing and management of these infants. Guidance is subject to change as more information becomes available; the latest information, including answers to commonly asked questions, can be found online (http://www.cdc.gov/zika). Pediatric health care providers should work closely with obstetric providers to identify infants whose mothers were potentially infected with Zika virus during pregnancy (based on travel to or residence in an area with Zika virus transmission [http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices]), and review fetal ultrasounds and maternal testing for Zika virus infection (see Interim Guidelines for Pregnant Women During a Zika Virus Outbreak*) (1). Zika virus testing is recommended for 1) infants with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications born to women who traveled to or resided in an area with Zika virus transmission while pregnant; or 2) infants born to mothers with positive or inconclusive test results for Zika virus infection. For infants with laboratory evidence of a possible congenital Zika virus infection, additional clinical evaluation and follow-up is recommended. Health care providers should contact their state or territorial health department to facilitate testing. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26820387/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6503e3 ER -