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Dating Violence and Injury Among Youth Exposed to Violence.
Pediatrics. 2016 Feb; 137(2):e20152627.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess gender differences in the proportion of adolescents reporting teen dating violence (TDV) and the frequency of TDV at multiple age points across adolescence in a high-risk sample of youth with previous exposure to violence.

METHODS

A cross-sectional, high-risk sample of boys and girls (n = 1149) ages 11 to 17 years completed surveys assessing TDV and self-defense. Indices of TDV included perpetration and victimization scales of controlling behaviors, psychological TDV, physical TDV, sexual TDV, fear/intimidation, and injury.

RESULTS

More girls reported perpetrating psychological and physical TDV, whereas twice as many boys reported sexual TDV perpetration. More girls reported fear/intimidation victimization than boys. When comparing the frequency of TDV across adolescence, boys reported more sexual TDV victimization at younger ages, and girls demonstrated a trend toward more victimization at older ages. Likewise, younger boys reported more fear/intimidation and injury perpetration and injury victimization than younger girls. However, by age 17, girls reported more injury perpetration than boys, and reports of injury victimization and use of self-defense did not differ. Notably, despite potential parity in injury, girls consistently reported more fear/intimidation victimization associated with TDV.

CONCLUSIONS

Contrary to data suggesting that girls experience far more sexual TDV and injury, these data suggest that at specific times during adolescence, boys among high-risk populations may be equally at risk for victimization. However, the psychological consequences (fear) are greater for girls. These findings suggest a need to tailor strategies to prevent TDV based on both age- and gender-specific characteristics in high-risk populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Violence Prevention and dreidy@cdc.gov.Division of Violence Prevention and.National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Violence Prevention and.Division of Violence Prevention and.Division of Violence Prevention and.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26826215

Citation

Reidy, Dennis E., et al. "Dating Violence and Injury Among Youth Exposed to Violence." Pediatrics, vol. 137, no. 2, 2016, pp. e20152627.
Reidy DE, Kearns MC, Houry D, et al. Dating Violence and Injury Among Youth Exposed to Violence. Pediatrics. 2016;137(2):e20152627.
Reidy, D. E., Kearns, M. C., Houry, D., Valle, L. A., Holland, K. M., & Marshall, K. J. (2016). Dating Violence and Injury Among Youth Exposed to Violence. Pediatrics, 137(2), e20152627. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2015-2627
Reidy DE, et al. Dating Violence and Injury Among Youth Exposed to Violence. Pediatrics. 2016;137(2):e20152627. PubMed PMID: 26826215.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dating Violence and Injury Among Youth Exposed to Violence. AU - Reidy,Dennis E, AU - Kearns,Megan C, AU - Houry,Debra, AU - Valle,Linda A, AU - Holland,Kristin M, AU - Marshall,Khiya J, Y1 - 2016/01/29/ PY - 2015/11/16/accepted PY - 2016/1/31/entrez PY - 2016/1/31/pubmed PY - 2016/7/7/medline SP - e20152627 EP - e20152627 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 137 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess gender differences in the proportion of adolescents reporting teen dating violence (TDV) and the frequency of TDV at multiple age points across adolescence in a high-risk sample of youth with previous exposure to violence. METHODS: A cross-sectional, high-risk sample of boys and girls (n = 1149) ages 11 to 17 years completed surveys assessing TDV and self-defense. Indices of TDV included perpetration and victimization scales of controlling behaviors, psychological TDV, physical TDV, sexual TDV, fear/intimidation, and injury. RESULTS: More girls reported perpetrating psychological and physical TDV, whereas twice as many boys reported sexual TDV perpetration. More girls reported fear/intimidation victimization than boys. When comparing the frequency of TDV across adolescence, boys reported more sexual TDV victimization at younger ages, and girls demonstrated a trend toward more victimization at older ages. Likewise, younger boys reported more fear/intimidation and injury perpetration and injury victimization than younger girls. However, by age 17, girls reported more injury perpetration than boys, and reports of injury victimization and use of self-defense did not differ. Notably, despite potential parity in injury, girls consistently reported more fear/intimidation victimization associated with TDV. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to data suggesting that girls experience far more sexual TDV and injury, these data suggest that at specific times during adolescence, boys among high-risk populations may be equally at risk for victimization. However, the psychological consequences (fear) are greater for girls. These findings suggest a need to tailor strategies to prevent TDV based on both age- and gender-specific characteristics in high-risk populations. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26826215/Dating_Violence_and_Injury_Among_Youth_Exposed_to_Violence_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=26826215 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -