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The Just-Meaningful Difference in Speech-to-Noise Ratio.
Trends Hear. 2016 Feb 01; 20TH

Abstract

The speech-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an environment plays a vital role in speech communication for both normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. While hearing-assistance devices attempt to deliver as favorable an SNR as possible, there may be discrepancies between noticeable and meaningful improvements in SNR. Furthermore, it is not clear how much of an SNR improvement is necessary to induce intervention-seeking behavior. Here, we report on a series of experiments examining the just-meaningful difference (JMD) in SNR. All experiments used sentences in same-spectrum noise, with two intervals on each trial mimicking examples of pre- and post-benefit situations. Different groups of NH and HI adults were asked (a) to rate how much better or worse the change in SNR was in a number of paired examples, (b) if they would swap the worse for the better SNR (e.g., their current device for another), or (c) if they would be willing to go to the clinic for the given increase in SNR. The mean SNR JMD based on better or worse ratings (one arbitrary unit) was similar to the just-noticeable difference, approximately 3 dB. However, the mean SNR JMD for the more clinically relevant tasks-willingness (at least 50% of the time) to swap devices or attend the clinic for a change in SNR--was 6 to 8 dB regardless of hearing ability. This SNR JMD of the order of 6 dB provides a new benchmark, indicating the SNR improvement necessary to immediately motivate participants to seek intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MRC/CSO Institute of Hearing Research-Scottish Section, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, UK david@ihr.gla.ac.uk.MRC/CSO Institute of Hearing Research-Scottish Section, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, UK.MRC Institute of Hearing Research, Nottingham, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26834121

Citation

McShefferty, David, et al. "The Just-Meaningful Difference in Speech-to-Noise Ratio." Trends in Hearing, vol. 20, 2016.
McShefferty D, Whitmer WM, Akeroyd MA. The Just-Meaningful Difference in Speech-to-Noise Ratio. Trends Hear. 2016;20.
McShefferty, D., Whitmer, W. M., & Akeroyd, M. A. (2016). The Just-Meaningful Difference in Speech-to-Noise Ratio. Trends in Hearing, 20. https://doi.org/10.1177/2331216515626570
McShefferty D, Whitmer WM, Akeroyd MA. The Just-Meaningful Difference in Speech-to-Noise Ratio. Trends Hear. 2016 Feb 1;20 PubMed PMID: 26834121.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Just-Meaningful Difference in Speech-to-Noise Ratio. AU - McShefferty,David, AU - Whitmer,William M, AU - Akeroyd,Michael A, Y1 - 2016/02/01/ PY - 2016/2/3/entrez PY - 2016/2/3/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - auditory perception KW - hearing impairment KW - just-meaningful difference KW - speech-to-noise ratio JF - Trends in hearing JO - Trends Hear VL - 20 N2 - The speech-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an environment plays a vital role in speech communication for both normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. While hearing-assistance devices attempt to deliver as favorable an SNR as possible, there may be discrepancies between noticeable and meaningful improvements in SNR. Furthermore, it is not clear how much of an SNR improvement is necessary to induce intervention-seeking behavior. Here, we report on a series of experiments examining the just-meaningful difference (JMD) in SNR. All experiments used sentences in same-spectrum noise, with two intervals on each trial mimicking examples of pre- and post-benefit situations. Different groups of NH and HI adults were asked (a) to rate how much better or worse the change in SNR was in a number of paired examples, (b) if they would swap the worse for the better SNR (e.g., their current device for another), or (c) if they would be willing to go to the clinic for the given increase in SNR. The mean SNR JMD based on better or worse ratings (one arbitrary unit) was similar to the just-noticeable difference, approximately 3 dB. However, the mean SNR JMD for the more clinically relevant tasks-willingness (at least 50% of the time) to swap devices or attend the clinic for a change in SNR--was 6 to 8 dB regardless of hearing ability. This SNR JMD of the order of 6 dB provides a new benchmark, indicating the SNR improvement necessary to immediately motivate participants to seek intervention. SN - 2331-2165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26834121/The_Just_Meaningful_Difference_in_Speech_to_Noise_Ratio_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2331216515626570?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -