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Children with Special Health Care Needs, Supplemental Security Income, and Food Insecurity.
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2016 Feb-Mar; 37(2):140-7.JD

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess food insecurity in low-income households with young children with/without special health care needs (SHCN) and evaluate relationships between child Supplemental Security Income (SSI) receipt and food insecurity.

METHODS

A cross-sectional survey (2013-2015) of caregivers was conducted at 5 medical centers. Eligibility included index child age <48 months without private health insurance and a caregiver fluent in English or Spanish. Interviews included sociodemographics, 5-item Children with Special Health Care Needs Screener, 18-item US Food Security Survey Module, household public assistance program participation, and child SSI receipt. Household and child food insecurity, each, were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression models.

RESULTS

Of 6724 index children, 81.5% screened negative for SHCN, 14.8% positive for SHCN (no SSI), and 3.7% had SHCN and received SSI. After covariate control, households, with versus without a child with SHCN, were more likely to experience household (Adjusted odds ratios [AOR] 1.24, 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.03-1.48) and child (AOR 1.35, 95% CI, 1.11-1.63) food insecurity. Among households with children with SHCN, those with children receiving, versus not receiving SSI, were more likely to report household (AOR 1.42, 95% CI, 0.97-2.09) but not child food insecurity.

CONCLUSION

Low-income households with young children having SHCN are at risk for food insecurity, regardless of child SSI receipt and household participation in other public assistance programs. Policy recommendations include reevaluation of assistance programs' income and medical deduction criteria for households with children with SHCN to decrease the food insecurity risk faced by these children and their families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

*Department of Pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA; †Department of Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center and Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA; ‡Data Coordinating Center, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA; §Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD; ‖Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN; ¶Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA; #Department of Community Health and Prevention, Drexel University School of Public Health, Philadelphia, PA; **Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26836641

Citation

Rose-Jacobs, Ruth, et al. "Children With Special Health Care Needs, Supplemental Security Income, and Food Insecurity." Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics : JDBP, vol. 37, no. 2, 2016, pp. 140-7.
Rose-Jacobs R, Fiore JG, Ettinger de Cuba S, et al. Children with Special Health Care Needs, Supplemental Security Income, and Food Insecurity. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2016;37(2):140-7.
Rose-Jacobs, R., Fiore, J. G., Ettinger de Cuba, S., Black, M., Cutts, D. B., Coleman, S. M., Heeren, T., Chilton, M., Casey, P., Cook, J., & Frank, D. A. (2016). Children with Special Health Care Needs, Supplemental Security Income, and Food Insecurity. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics : JDBP, 37(2), 140-7. https://doi.org/10.1097/DBP.0000000000000260
Rose-Jacobs R, et al. Children With Special Health Care Needs, Supplemental Security Income, and Food Insecurity. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2016 Feb-Mar;37(2):140-7. PubMed PMID: 26836641.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Children with Special Health Care Needs, Supplemental Security Income, and Food Insecurity. AU - Rose-Jacobs,Ruth, AU - Fiore,Jennifer Goodhart, AU - Ettinger de Cuba,Stephanie, AU - Black,Maureen, AU - Cutts,Diana B, AU - Coleman,Sharon M, AU - Heeren,Timothy, AU - Chilton,Mariana, AU - Casey,Patrick, AU - Cook,John, AU - Frank,Deborah A, PY - 2016/2/3/entrez PY - 2016/2/3/pubmed PY - 2016/11/1/medline SP - 140 EP - 7 JF - Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics : JDBP JO - J Dev Behav Pediatr VL - 37 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess food insecurity in low-income households with young children with/without special health care needs (SHCN) and evaluate relationships between child Supplemental Security Income (SSI) receipt and food insecurity. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey (2013-2015) of caregivers was conducted at 5 medical centers. Eligibility included index child age <48 months without private health insurance and a caregiver fluent in English or Spanish. Interviews included sociodemographics, 5-item Children with Special Health Care Needs Screener, 18-item US Food Security Survey Module, household public assistance program participation, and child SSI receipt. Household and child food insecurity, each, were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: Of 6724 index children, 81.5% screened negative for SHCN, 14.8% positive for SHCN (no SSI), and 3.7% had SHCN and received SSI. After covariate control, households, with versus without a child with SHCN, were more likely to experience household (Adjusted odds ratios [AOR] 1.24, 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.03-1.48) and child (AOR 1.35, 95% CI, 1.11-1.63) food insecurity. Among households with children with SHCN, those with children receiving, versus not receiving SSI, were more likely to report household (AOR 1.42, 95% CI, 0.97-2.09) but not child food insecurity. CONCLUSION: Low-income households with young children having SHCN are at risk for food insecurity, regardless of child SSI receipt and household participation in other public assistance programs. Policy recommendations include reevaluation of assistance programs' income and medical deduction criteria for households with children with SHCN to decrease the food insecurity risk faced by these children and their families. SN - 1536-7312 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26836641/Children_with_Special_Health_Care_Needs_Supplemental_Security_Income_and_Food_Insecurity_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/DBP.0000000000000260 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -