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Vitamin D status in relation to Crohn's disease: Meta-analysis of observational studies.
Nutrition 2016; 32(5):505-14N

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Inconsistent findings have been published regarding vitamin D status among patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and the association with disease severity. We aimed to perform a meta-analysis evaluating serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D and 1,25 dehydroxyvitamin D among CD patients compared with healthy and non-healthy controls, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, and the association with disease.

METHODS

We searched MEDLINE, SCOPUS, EMBASE, and Google Scholar up to March 2015 for observational studies assessing serum vitamin D levels in CD patients. A total of 63 studies were included in the following four meta-analyses: 1) a meta-analysis on the mean difference of 25(OH)D levels in CD patients compared with healthy (number of studies = 27) and non-healthy (n = 25) controls; 2) a meta-analysis on the mean difference of 1,25(OH)2 D3 levels in CD patients compared with healthy (n = 7) and non-healthy (n = 8) controls; 3) a meta-analysis on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (n = 34); 4) a meta-analysis on the correlation coefficients between vitamin D status severity of CD (n = 6). Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were used to discover possible sources of between-study heterogeneity.

RESULTS

It was found that CD patients had lower levels of 25(OH)D compared with healthy (-3.99 ng/mL; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -5.91 to -2.08) but not non-healthy controls (-1.07 ng/mL; 95% CI: -2.84 to 0.70). There was also no significant mean difference for 1,25(OH)2 D3 for both healthy and non-healthy controls. Meta-analysis on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency showed an overall prevalence of 57.7% (95% CI: 0.502-0.649). An inverse association was observed between serum vitamin D and severity of CD (-0.36; 95% CI: -0.48 to -0.24). Meta-regression showed that mean levels of 25(OH)D were decreased 0.09 for each unit change of latitude among CD patients compared with healthy controls (B = -0.09, P = 0.004, I(2) residual = 86.08%).

CONCLUSIONS

We found that patients with Crohn's disease had lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations compared with their healthy counterparts, and more than half of them have hypovitaminosis D. Moreover, there was an inverse correlation between circulating 25(OH)D concentrations and severity of Crohn's disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; Students' Research Committee, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; Students' Research Committee, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: esmaillzadeh@hlth.mui.ac.ir.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26837598

Citation

Sadeghian, Mehdi, et al. "Vitamin D Status in Relation to Crohn's Disease: Meta-analysis of Observational Studies." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 32, no. 5, 2016, pp. 505-14.
Sadeghian M, Saneei P, Siassi F, et al. Vitamin D status in relation to Crohn's disease: Meta-analysis of observational studies. Nutrition. 2016;32(5):505-14.
Sadeghian, M., Saneei, P., Siassi, F., & Esmaillzadeh, A. (2016). Vitamin D status in relation to Crohn's disease: Meta-analysis of observational studies. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 32(5), pp. 505-14. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2015.11.008.
Sadeghian M, et al. Vitamin D Status in Relation to Crohn's Disease: Meta-analysis of Observational Studies. Nutrition. 2016;32(5):505-14. PubMed PMID: 26837598.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D status in relation to Crohn's disease: Meta-analysis of observational studies. AU - Sadeghian,Mehdi, AU - Saneei,Parvane, AU - Siassi,Fereydoun, AU - Esmaillzadeh,Ahmad, Y1 - 2015/12/22/ PY - 2015/07/26/received PY - 2015/11/16/revised PY - 2015/11/17/accepted PY - 2016/2/4/entrez PY - 2016/2/4/pubmed PY - 2016/12/22/medline KW - Crohn's disease KW - Deficiency KW - Disease activity KW - Meta-analysis KW - Vitamin D status SP - 505 EP - 14 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 32 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Inconsistent findings have been published regarding vitamin D status among patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and the association with disease severity. We aimed to perform a meta-analysis evaluating serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D and 1,25 dehydroxyvitamin D among CD patients compared with healthy and non-healthy controls, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, and the association with disease. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, SCOPUS, EMBASE, and Google Scholar up to March 2015 for observational studies assessing serum vitamin D levels in CD patients. A total of 63 studies were included in the following four meta-analyses: 1) a meta-analysis on the mean difference of 25(OH)D levels in CD patients compared with healthy (number of studies = 27) and non-healthy (n = 25) controls; 2) a meta-analysis on the mean difference of 1,25(OH)2 D3 levels in CD patients compared with healthy (n = 7) and non-healthy (n = 8) controls; 3) a meta-analysis on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (n = 34); 4) a meta-analysis on the correlation coefficients between vitamin D status severity of CD (n = 6). Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were used to discover possible sources of between-study heterogeneity. RESULTS: It was found that CD patients had lower levels of 25(OH)D compared with healthy (-3.99 ng/mL; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -5.91 to -2.08) but not non-healthy controls (-1.07 ng/mL; 95% CI: -2.84 to 0.70). There was also no significant mean difference for 1,25(OH)2 D3 for both healthy and non-healthy controls. Meta-analysis on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency showed an overall prevalence of 57.7% (95% CI: 0.502-0.649). An inverse association was observed between serum vitamin D and severity of CD (-0.36; 95% CI: -0.48 to -0.24). Meta-regression showed that mean levels of 25(OH)D were decreased 0.09 for each unit change of latitude among CD patients compared with healthy controls (B = -0.09, P = 0.004, I(2) residual = 86.08%). CONCLUSIONS: We found that patients with Crohn's disease had lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations compared with their healthy counterparts, and more than half of them have hypovitaminosis D. Moreover, there was an inverse correlation between circulating 25(OH)D concentrations and severity of Crohn's disease. SN - 1873-1244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26837598/Vitamin_D_status_in_relation_to_Crohn's_disease:_Meta_analysis_of_observational_studies_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(15)00469-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -