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Understanding drivers of Demand for Emergency Service Trends in Years 2010-2014 in New South Wales: An initial overview of the DESTINY project.
Emerg Med Australas. 2016 Apr; 28(2):179-86.EM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study aims to describe the general characteristics and data definitions used in a population-based data set of ED presentations in New South Wales (NSW), used to form the basis of future-trend analyses.

METHODS

Retrospective analysis of the Emergency Department Data Collection registry, which provided clinical and demographic information of ED presentations across all EDs in NSW between 2010 and 2014. Presenting problems and ED diagnoses were classified using broad clinical categories including injury/musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, ear nose and throat, and mental health. Presentations were linked by patient to allow for analysis of representations, and population data were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

RESULTS

There were 11.8 million presentations that were analysed from 150 EDs (80.6% of all EDs). The rate of ED presentations was highest in those aged 85 years and older and appears to increase across all age groups between 2010 and 2014. The most common ED diagnosis categories were injury/musculoskeletal (27.5%) followed by abdominal/gastrointestinal (12.3%), respiratory (9%) and cardiovascular (8%). Both the Systematised Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (66%) and the International Classification of Diseases (24%) were used to code ED diagnoses.

CONCLUSIONS

The elderly population had the highest rate of ED attendances. The use of diverse diagnosis classifications and source information systems may present problems with further analysis. Patterns and characteristics of ED presentations in NSW were broadly consistent with those reported in other states in Australia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Discipline of Emergency Medicine, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. School of Nursing, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Discipline of Emergency Medicine, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.The George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. School of Nursing and Midwifery, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26840615

Citation

Dinh, Michael M., et al. "Understanding Drivers of Demand for Emergency Service Trends in Years 2010-2014 in New South Wales: an Initial Overview of the DESTINY Project." Emergency Medicine Australasia : EMA, vol. 28, no. 2, 2016, pp. 179-86.
Dinh MM, Berendsen Russell S, Bein KJ, et al. Understanding drivers of Demand for Emergency Service Trends in Years 2010-2014 in New South Wales: An initial overview of the DESTINY project. Emerg Med Australas. 2016;28(2):179-86.
Dinh, M. M., Berendsen Russell, S., Bein, K. J., Chalkley, D., Muscatello, D., Paoloni, R., & Ivers, R. (2016). Understanding drivers of Demand for Emergency Service Trends in Years 2010-2014 in New South Wales: An initial overview of the DESTINY project. Emergency Medicine Australasia : EMA, 28(2), 179-86. https://doi.org/10.1111/1742-6723.12542
Dinh MM, et al. Understanding Drivers of Demand for Emergency Service Trends in Years 2010-2014 in New South Wales: an Initial Overview of the DESTINY Project. Emerg Med Australas. 2016;28(2):179-86. PubMed PMID: 26840615.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Understanding drivers of Demand for Emergency Service Trends in Years 2010-2014 in New South Wales: An initial overview of the DESTINY project. AU - Dinh,Michael M, AU - Berendsen Russell,Saartje, AU - Bein,Kendall J, AU - Chalkley,Dane, AU - Muscatello,David, AU - Paoloni,Richard, AU - Ivers,Rebecca, Y1 - 2016/02/03/ PY - 2015/09/11/received PY - 2015/11/16/revised PY - 2015/12/08/accepted PY - 2016/2/4/entrez PY - 2016/2/4/pubmed PY - 2017/1/7/medline KW - demand KW - emergency department KW - population SP - 179 EP - 86 JF - Emergency medicine Australasia : EMA JO - Emerg Med Australas VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the general characteristics and data definitions used in a population-based data set of ED presentations in New South Wales (NSW), used to form the basis of future-trend analyses. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of the Emergency Department Data Collection registry, which provided clinical and demographic information of ED presentations across all EDs in NSW between 2010 and 2014. Presenting problems and ED diagnoses were classified using broad clinical categories including injury/musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, ear nose and throat, and mental health. Presentations were linked by patient to allow for analysis of representations, and population data were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. RESULTS: There were 11.8 million presentations that were analysed from 150 EDs (80.6% of all EDs). The rate of ED presentations was highest in those aged 85 years and older and appears to increase across all age groups between 2010 and 2014. The most common ED diagnosis categories were injury/musculoskeletal (27.5%) followed by abdominal/gastrointestinal (12.3%), respiratory (9%) and cardiovascular (8%). Both the Systematised Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (66%) and the International Classification of Diseases (24%) were used to code ED diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: The elderly population had the highest rate of ED attendances. The use of diverse diagnosis classifications and source information systems may present problems with further analysis. Patterns and characteristics of ED presentations in NSW were broadly consistent with those reported in other states in Australia. SN - 1742-6723 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26840615/Understanding_drivers_of_Demand_for_Emergency_Service_Trends_in_Years_2010_2014_in_New_South_Wales:_An_initial_overview_of_the_DESTINY_project_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1742-6723.12542 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -