Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Healthcare Workers Emotions, Perceived Stressors and Coping Strategies During a MERS-CoV Outbreak.
Clin Med Res. 2016 Mar; 14(1):7-14.CM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high risk of contracting Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) during an epidemic. We explored the emotions, perceived stressors, and coping strategies of healthcare workers who worked during a MERS-CoV outbreak in our hospital.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional descriptive survey design.

SETTING

A tertiary care hospital.

PARTICIPANTS

HCWs (150) who worked in high risk areas during the April-May 2014 MERS-CoV outbreak that occurred in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

METHODS

We developed and administered a "MERS-CoV staff questionnaire" to study participants. The questionnaire consisted of 5 sections with 72 questions. The sections evaluated hospital staffs emotions, perceived stressors, factors that reduced their stress, coping strategies, and motivators to work during future outbreaks. Responses were scored on a scale from 0-3. The varying levels of stress or effectiveness of measures were reported as mean and standard deviation, as appropriate.

RESULTS

Completed questionnaires were returned by 117 (78%) of the participants. The results had many unique elements. HCWs ethical obligation to their profession pushed them to continue with their jobs. The main sentiments centered upon fear of personal safety and well-being of colleagues and family. Positive attitudes in the workplace, clinical improvement of infected colleagues, and stoppage of disease transmission among HCWs after adopting strict protective measures alleviated their fear and drove them through the epidemic. They appreciated recognition of their efforts by hospital management and expected similar acknowledgment, infection control guidance, and equipment would entice them to work during future epidemics.

CONCLUSION

The MERS-CoV outbreak was a distressing time for our staff. Hospitals can enhance HCWs experiences during any future MERS-CoV outbreak by focusing on the above mentioned aspects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia dr.imrankhalid@yahoo.com.King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26847480

Citation

Khalid, Imran, et al. "Healthcare Workers Emotions, Perceived Stressors and Coping Strategies During a MERS-CoV Outbreak." Clinical Medicine & Research, vol. 14, no. 1, 2016, pp. 7-14.
Khalid I, Khalid TJ, Qabajah MR, et al. Healthcare Workers Emotions, Perceived Stressors and Coping Strategies During a MERS-CoV Outbreak. Clin Med Res. 2016;14(1):7-14.
Khalid, I., Khalid, T. J., Qabajah, M. R., Barnard, A. G., & Qushmaq, I. A. (2016). Healthcare Workers Emotions, Perceived Stressors and Coping Strategies During a MERS-CoV Outbreak. Clinical Medicine & Research, 14(1), 7-14. https://doi.org/10.3121/cmr.2016.1303
Khalid I, et al. Healthcare Workers Emotions, Perceived Stressors and Coping Strategies During a MERS-CoV Outbreak. Clin Med Res. 2016;14(1):7-14. PubMed PMID: 26847480.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Healthcare Workers Emotions, Perceived Stressors and Coping Strategies During a MERS-CoV Outbreak. AU - Khalid,Imran, AU - Khalid,Tabindeh J, AU - Qabajah,Mohammed R, AU - Barnard,Aletta G, AU - Qushmaq,Ismael A, Y1 - 2016/02/04/ PY - 2015/08/04/received PY - 2016/01/14/accepted PY - 2016/2/6/entrez PY - 2016/2/6/pubmed PY - 2017/3/8/medline KW - Coping strategies KW - Emotions KW - Healthcare workers KW - MERS-CoV SP - 7 EP - 14 JF - Clinical medicine & research JO - Clin Med Res VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high risk of contracting Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) during an epidemic. We explored the emotions, perceived stressors, and coping strategies of healthcare workers who worked during a MERS-CoV outbreak in our hospital. DESIGN: A cross-sectional descriptive survey design. SETTING: A tertiary care hospital. PARTICIPANTS: HCWs (150) who worked in high risk areas during the April-May 2014 MERS-CoV outbreak that occurred in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: We developed and administered a "MERS-CoV staff questionnaire" to study participants. The questionnaire consisted of 5 sections with 72 questions. The sections evaluated hospital staffs emotions, perceived stressors, factors that reduced their stress, coping strategies, and motivators to work during future outbreaks. Responses were scored on a scale from 0-3. The varying levels of stress or effectiveness of measures were reported as mean and standard deviation, as appropriate. RESULTS: Completed questionnaires were returned by 117 (78%) of the participants. The results had many unique elements. HCWs ethical obligation to their profession pushed them to continue with their jobs. The main sentiments centered upon fear of personal safety and well-being of colleagues and family. Positive attitudes in the workplace, clinical improvement of infected colleagues, and stoppage of disease transmission among HCWs after adopting strict protective measures alleviated their fear and drove them through the epidemic. They appreciated recognition of their efforts by hospital management and expected similar acknowledgment, infection control guidance, and equipment would entice them to work during future epidemics. CONCLUSION: The MERS-CoV outbreak was a distressing time for our staff. Hospitals can enhance HCWs experiences during any future MERS-CoV outbreak by focusing on the above mentioned aspects. SN - 1554-6179 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26847480/Healthcare_Workers_Emotions_Perceived_Stressors_and_Coping_Strategies_During_a_MERS_CoV_Outbreak_ L2 - http://www.clinmedres.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=26847480 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -