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Tuberculous epididymo-orchitis masquerading as acute scrotum.
BMJ Case Rep. 2016 Feb 04; 2016BC

Abstract

An 18-year-old boy, a refugee from Afghanistan, with no significant medical history, presented after 1 day of severe left testicular pain. History, clinical examination and scrotal ultrasound suggested the diagnosis of epididymo-orchitis. He was discharged on a 2-week course of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Six weeks later, he re-presented with a testicular abscess, continuous with the epididymal head. Incision and drainage led to laboratory confirmation of tuberculous infection. He was treated with isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, pyrazinamide and vitamin B6 for 9 months, with good response. Despite meeting high-risk criteria for tuberculosis, our patient had a delayed diagnosis. We present the case and discuss the lessons learned.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Surgery, Lyell McEwin Hospital, Elizabeth Vale, South Australia, Australia.Department of Urology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.Department of Urology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.Department of Urology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26847806

Citation

Kinnear, Ned, et al. "Tuberculous Epididymo-orchitis Masquerading as Acute Scrotum." BMJ Case Reports, vol. 2016, 2016.
Kinnear N, Hoh I, Campillo P, et al. Tuberculous epididymo-orchitis masquerading as acute scrotum. BMJ Case Rep. 2016;2016.
Kinnear, N., Hoh, I., Campillo, P., & Bolt, J. (2016). Tuberculous epididymo-orchitis masquerading as acute scrotum. BMJ Case Reports, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2015-214060
Kinnear N, et al. Tuberculous Epididymo-orchitis Masquerading as Acute Scrotum. BMJ Case Rep. 2016 Feb 4;2016 PubMed PMID: 26847806.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tuberculous epididymo-orchitis masquerading as acute scrotum. AU - Kinnear,Ned, AU - Hoh,Ivan, AU - Campillo,Pedro, AU - Bolt,John, Y1 - 2016/02/04/ PY - 2016/2/6/entrez PY - 2016/2/6/pubmed PY - 2016/11/1/medline JF - BMJ case reports JO - BMJ Case Rep VL - 2016 N2 - An 18-year-old boy, a refugee from Afghanistan, with no significant medical history, presented after 1 day of severe left testicular pain. History, clinical examination and scrotal ultrasound suggested the diagnosis of epididymo-orchitis. He was discharged on a 2-week course of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Six weeks later, he re-presented with a testicular abscess, continuous with the epididymal head. Incision and drainage led to laboratory confirmation of tuberculous infection. He was treated with isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, pyrazinamide and vitamin B6 for 9 months, with good response. Despite meeting high-risk criteria for tuberculosis, our patient had a delayed diagnosis. We present the case and discuss the lessons learned. SN - 1757-790X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26847806/Tuberculous_epididymo_orchitis_masquerading_as_acute_scrotum_ L2 - https://casereports.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=26847806 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -