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Prevalence of Comorbidities, Overweight and Obesity in an International Sample of People with Multiple Sclerosis and Associations with Modifiable Lifestyle Factors.
PLoS One 2016; 11(2):e0148573Plos

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disorder, often affecting young people. Comorbid disorders such as depression, anxiety and hypertension are common and can affect disease course, treatment, and quality of life (QOL) of people with MS (PwMS). The associations between comorbidities, body mass index (BMI) and health outcomes are not well studied in MS, although research shows most PwMS are overweight. Most data on the prevalence of comorbidities and obesity in PwMS comes from North American populations. This study describes the prevalence of comorbidities, overweight and obesity and associations with modifiable factors in an international sample of PwMS recruited online through social media, MS societies and websites. The online survey consisted of validated and researcher-devised instruments to assess self-reported health outcomes and lifestyle behaviors. Of the 2399 respondents, 22.5% were overweight, 19.4% were obese and 67.2% reported at least one comorbidity, with back pain (36.2%), depression (31.7%), anxiety (29.1%) and arthritis (13.7%) most prevalent and most limiting in daily activities. Obesity and most comorbid disorders were significantly more prevalent in North America. Obese participants were more likely to have comorbidities, especially diabetes (OR 4.8) and high blood pressure (OR 4.5) but also depression (OR 2.2). Being overweight, obese, or a former, or current smoker was associated with an increase in the number of comorbidities; while healthy diet, physical activity (borderline significant) and moderate alcohol consumption were associated with decreased number of comorbidities. Increasing number of comorbidities was related to worse QOL, increased odds of disability and prior relapse. Obese PwMS had higher odds of disability and lower QOL. The associations between BMI, comorbidities and health outcomes are likely to be bi-directional and associated with lifestyle behaviors. Preventing and treating comorbid disorders and obesity in PwMS is warranted, and advice regarding healthy and risky lifestyle may assist in improving health outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26849357

Citation

Marck, Claudia Helena, et al. "Prevalence of Comorbidities, Overweight and Obesity in an International Sample of People With Multiple Sclerosis and Associations With Modifiable Lifestyle Factors." PloS One, vol. 11, no. 2, 2016, pp. e0148573.
Marck CH, Neate SL, Taylor KL, et al. Prevalence of Comorbidities, Overweight and Obesity in an International Sample of People with Multiple Sclerosis and Associations with Modifiable Lifestyle Factors. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(2):e0148573.
Marck, C. H., Neate, S. L., Taylor, K. L., Weiland, T. J., & Jelinek, G. A. (2016). Prevalence of Comorbidities, Overweight and Obesity in an International Sample of People with Multiple Sclerosis and Associations with Modifiable Lifestyle Factors. PloS One, 11(2), pp. e0148573. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0148573.
Marck CH, et al. Prevalence of Comorbidities, Overweight and Obesity in an International Sample of People With Multiple Sclerosis and Associations With Modifiable Lifestyle Factors. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(2):e0148573. PubMed PMID: 26849357.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of Comorbidities, Overweight and Obesity in an International Sample of People with Multiple Sclerosis and Associations with Modifiable Lifestyle Factors. AU - Marck,Claudia Helena, AU - Neate,Sandra Leanne, AU - Taylor,Keryn Louise, AU - Weiland,Tracey Joy, AU - Jelinek,George Alexander, Y1 - 2016/02/05/ PY - 2015/10/28/received PY - 2016/01/19/accepted PY - 2016/2/6/entrez PY - 2016/2/6/pubmed PY - 2016/7/20/medline SP - e0148573 EP - e0148573 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disorder, often affecting young people. Comorbid disorders such as depression, anxiety and hypertension are common and can affect disease course, treatment, and quality of life (QOL) of people with MS (PwMS). The associations between comorbidities, body mass index (BMI) and health outcomes are not well studied in MS, although research shows most PwMS are overweight. Most data on the prevalence of comorbidities and obesity in PwMS comes from North American populations. This study describes the prevalence of comorbidities, overweight and obesity and associations with modifiable factors in an international sample of PwMS recruited online through social media, MS societies and websites. The online survey consisted of validated and researcher-devised instruments to assess self-reported health outcomes and lifestyle behaviors. Of the 2399 respondents, 22.5% were overweight, 19.4% were obese and 67.2% reported at least one comorbidity, with back pain (36.2%), depression (31.7%), anxiety (29.1%) and arthritis (13.7%) most prevalent and most limiting in daily activities. Obesity and most comorbid disorders were significantly more prevalent in North America. Obese participants were more likely to have comorbidities, especially diabetes (OR 4.8) and high blood pressure (OR 4.5) but also depression (OR 2.2). Being overweight, obese, or a former, or current smoker was associated with an increase in the number of comorbidities; while healthy diet, physical activity (borderline significant) and moderate alcohol consumption were associated with decreased number of comorbidities. Increasing number of comorbidities was related to worse QOL, increased odds of disability and prior relapse. Obese PwMS had higher odds of disability and lower QOL. The associations between BMI, comorbidities and health outcomes are likely to be bi-directional and associated with lifestyle behaviors. Preventing and treating comorbid disorders and obesity in PwMS is warranted, and advice regarding healthy and risky lifestyle may assist in improving health outcomes. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26849357/Prevalence_of_Comorbidities_Overweight_and_Obesity_in_an_International_Sample_of_People_with_Multiple_Sclerosis_and_Associations_with_Modifiable_Lifestyle_Factors_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0148573 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -