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Nutrition education effective in increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among overweight and obese adults.

Abstract

Despite the benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption on weight and decreased risk for chronic disease, Americans' intake of fruits and vegetables is well below the recommended daily servings. While previous studies have assessed fruit and vegetable consumption and the influence of educational interventions on fruit and vegetable intake, no studies to date have examined the effects of nutrition education combined with provision of fruits and vegetables on changes in fruit and vegetable consumption among overweight and obese adults. The objectives of this study were to evaluate fruit and vegetable consumption patterns, including intake of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, provide education about benefits of consuming fruits and vegetables, expose participants to different varieties of fruits and vegetables, and improve fruit and vegetable consumption. Fifty-four adults (19 men/35 women; 44.7 ± 12.1 y) were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups. The control group received no intervention, the education group attended weekly nutrition lessons focused on benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption, and the fruit and vegetable group attended weekly nutrition lessons and received one serving of fruits and two servings of vegetables per day for 10 weeks. Intake of fruits and vegetables was assessed using semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires and three-day food records. Findings suggested that while the majority of participants failed to consume the recommended number of servings of fruits and vegetables per day, nutrition education was helpful in improving the consumption frequency of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables among overweight and obese adults.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Concordia College, 901 8th Street South, Moorhead, MN, 56562, USA. Electronic address: wagner@cord.edu.

    ,

    Department of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences, North Dakota State University, Department 2620, PO Box 6050, Fargo, ND, 58108-6050, USA. Electronic address: yeong.rhee@ndsu.edu.

    ,

    Department of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences, North Dakota State University, Department 2620, PO Box 6050, Fargo, ND, 58108-6050, USA. Electronic address: kerrie.hert@ndsu.edu.

    ,

    Department of Human Development and Family Science, North Dakota State University, Department 2615, PO Box 6050, Fargo, ND, 58108-6050, USA. Electronic address: elizabeth.salafia@ndsu.edu.

    Department of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences, North Dakota State University, Department 2620, PO Box 6050, Fargo, ND, 58108-6050, USA. Electronic address: d.terbizan@ndsu.edu.

    Source

    Appetite 100: 2016 May 01 pg 94-101

    MeSH

    Adult
    Antioxidants
    Body Mass Index
    Diet Records
    Diet, Reducing
    Female
    Food Assistance
    Fruit
    Group Processes
    Healthy Diet
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    North Dakota
    Nutritional Sciences
    Obesity
    Overweight
    Patient Compliance
    Patient Education as Topic
    Self Report
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26850310

    Citation

    Wagner, Meredith G., et al. "Nutrition Education Effective in Increasing Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Overweight and Obese Adults." Appetite, vol. 100, 2016, pp. 94-101.
    Wagner MG, Rhee Y, Honrath K, et al. Nutrition education effective in increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among overweight and obese adults. Appetite. 2016;100:94-101.
    Wagner, M. G., Rhee, Y., Honrath, K., Blodgett Salafia, E. H., & Terbizan, D. (2016). Nutrition education effective in increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among overweight and obese adults. Appetite, 100, pp. 94-101. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2016.02.002.
    Wagner MG, et al. Nutrition Education Effective in Increasing Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Overweight and Obese Adults. Appetite. 2016 May 1;100:94-101. PubMed PMID: 26850310.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrition education effective in increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among overweight and obese adults. AU - Wagner,Meredith G, AU - Rhee,Yeong, AU - Honrath,Kerrie, AU - Blodgett Salafia,Elizabeth H, AU - Terbizan,Donna, Y1 - 2016/02/02/ PY - 2015/02/23/received PY - 2015/09/24/revised PY - 2016/02/01/accepted PY - 2016/2/7/entrez PY - 2016/2/7/pubmed PY - 2016/12/17/medline KW - Chronic disease KW - Fruit KW - Obese KW - Overweight KW - Vegetable SP - 94 EP - 101 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 100 N2 - Despite the benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption on weight and decreased risk for chronic disease, Americans' intake of fruits and vegetables is well below the recommended daily servings. While previous studies have assessed fruit and vegetable consumption and the influence of educational interventions on fruit and vegetable intake, no studies to date have examined the effects of nutrition education combined with provision of fruits and vegetables on changes in fruit and vegetable consumption among overweight and obese adults. The objectives of this study were to evaluate fruit and vegetable consumption patterns, including intake of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, provide education about benefits of consuming fruits and vegetables, expose participants to different varieties of fruits and vegetables, and improve fruit and vegetable consumption. Fifty-four adults (19 men/35 women; 44.7 ± 12.1 y) were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups. The control group received no intervention, the education group attended weekly nutrition lessons focused on benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption, and the fruit and vegetable group attended weekly nutrition lessons and received one serving of fruits and two servings of vegetables per day for 10 weeks. Intake of fruits and vegetables was assessed using semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires and three-day food records. Findings suggested that while the majority of participants failed to consume the recommended number of servings of fruits and vegetables per day, nutrition education was helpful in improving the consumption frequency of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables among overweight and obese adults. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26850310/Nutrition_education_effective_in_increasing_fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_among_overweight_and_obese_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(16)30037-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -