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Dopamine disruption increases negotiation for cooperative interactions in a fish.
Sci Rep. 2016 Feb 08; 6:20817.SR

Abstract

Humans and other animals use previous experiences to make behavioural decisions, balancing the probabilities of receiving rewards or punishments with alternative actions. The dopaminergic system plays a key role in this assessment: for instance, a decrease in dopamine transmission, which is signalled by the failure of an expected reward, may elicit a distinct behavioural response. Here, we tested the effect of exogenously administered dopaminergic compounds on a cooperative vertebrate's decision-making process, in a natural setting. We show, in the Indo-Pacific bluestreak cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus, that blocking dopamine receptors in the wild induces cleaners to initiate more interactions with and to provide greater amounts of physical contact to their client fish partners. This costly form of tactile stimulation using their fins is typically used to prolong interactions and to reconcile with clients after cheating. Interestingly, client jolt rate, a correlate of cheating by cleaners, remained unaffected. Thus, in low effective dopaminergic transmission conditions cleaners may renegotiate the occurrence and duration of the interaction with a costly offer. Our results provide first evidence for a prominent role of the dopaminergic system in decision-making in the context of cooperation in fish.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CIBIO, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Universidade do Porto, Vairão, Portugal.MARE - Centro de Ciências do Mar e do Ambiente, Laboratório Marítimo da Guia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal.School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.Université de Neuchâtel, Institut de Biologie, Eco-Ethologie, Neuchâtel, Switzerland.CIBIO, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Universidade do Porto, Vairão, Portugal.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26853241

Citation

Messias, João P M., et al. "Dopamine Disruption Increases Negotiation for Cooperative Interactions in a Fish." Scientific Reports, vol. 6, 2016, p. 20817.
Messias JP, Paula JR, Grutter AS, et al. Dopamine disruption increases negotiation for cooperative interactions in a fish. Sci Rep. 2016;6:20817.
Messias, J. P., Paula, J. R., Grutter, A. S., Bshary, R., & Soares, M. C. (2016). Dopamine disruption increases negotiation for cooperative interactions in a fish. Scientific Reports, 6, 20817. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep20817
Messias JP, et al. Dopamine Disruption Increases Negotiation for Cooperative Interactions in a Fish. Sci Rep. 2016 Feb 8;6:20817. PubMed PMID: 26853241.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dopamine disruption increases negotiation for cooperative interactions in a fish. AU - Messias,João P M, AU - Paula,José R, AU - Grutter,Alexandra S, AU - Bshary,Redouan, AU - Soares,Marta C, Y1 - 2016/02/08/ PY - 2015/06/16/received PY - 2016/01/12/accepted PY - 2016/2/9/entrez PY - 2016/2/9/pubmed PY - 2017/1/4/medline SP - 20817 EP - 20817 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 6 N2 - Humans and other animals use previous experiences to make behavioural decisions, balancing the probabilities of receiving rewards or punishments with alternative actions. The dopaminergic system plays a key role in this assessment: for instance, a decrease in dopamine transmission, which is signalled by the failure of an expected reward, may elicit a distinct behavioural response. Here, we tested the effect of exogenously administered dopaminergic compounds on a cooperative vertebrate's decision-making process, in a natural setting. We show, in the Indo-Pacific bluestreak cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus, that blocking dopamine receptors in the wild induces cleaners to initiate more interactions with and to provide greater amounts of physical contact to their client fish partners. This costly form of tactile stimulation using their fins is typically used to prolong interactions and to reconcile with clients after cheating. Interestingly, client jolt rate, a correlate of cheating by cleaners, remained unaffected. Thus, in low effective dopaminergic transmission conditions cleaners may renegotiate the occurrence and duration of the interaction with a costly offer. Our results provide first evidence for a prominent role of the dopaminergic system in decision-making in the context of cooperation in fish. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26853241/Dopamine_disruption_increases_negotiation_for_cooperative_interactions_in_a_fish_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep20817 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -