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Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review.
Biol Psychiatry 2016; 79(7):557-67BP

Abstract

Cannabis use has been associated with impaired cognition during acute intoxication as well as in the unintoxicated state in long-term users. However, the evidence has been mixed and contested, and no systematic reviews of the literature on neuropsychological task-based measures of cognition have been conducted in an attempt to synthesize the findings. We systematically review the empirical research published in the past decade (from January 2004 to February 2015) on acute and chronic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids and on persistence or recovery after abstinence. We summarize the findings into the major categories of the cognitive domains investigated, considering sample characteristics and associations with various cannabis use parameters. Verbal learning and memory and attention are most consistently impaired by acute and chronic exposure to cannabis. Psychomotor function is most affected during acute intoxication, with some evidence for persistence in chronic users and after cessation of use. Impaired verbal memory, attention, and some executive functions may persist after prolonged abstinence, but persistence or recovery across all cognitive domains remains underresearched. Associations between poorer performance and a range of cannabis use parameters, including a younger age of onset, are frequently reported. Little further evidence has emerged for the development of tolerance to the acutely impairing effects of cannabis. Evidence for potential protection from harmful effects by cannabidiol continues to increase but is not definitive. In light of increasing trends toward legalization of cannabis, the knowledge gained from this body of research needs to be incorporated into strategies to minimize harm.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology and Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong.School of Psychology and Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong.School of Psychology and Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong.Brain and Mental Health Laboratory, Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Victoria, Australia.School of Psychology and Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong. Electronic address: nadia@uow.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26858214

Citation

Broyd, Samantha J., et al. "Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids On Human Cognition-A Systematic Review." Biological Psychiatry, vol. 79, no. 7, 2016, pp. 557-67.
Broyd SJ, van Hell HH, Beale C, et al. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review. Biol Psychiatry. 2016;79(7):557-67.
Broyd, S. J., van Hell, H. H., Beale, C., Yücel, M., & Solowij, N. (2016). Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review. Biological Psychiatry, 79(7), pp. 557-67. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2015.12.002.
Broyd SJ, et al. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids On Human Cognition-A Systematic Review. Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Apr 1;79(7):557-67. PubMed PMID: 26858214.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review. AU - Broyd,Samantha J, AU - van Hell,Hendrika H, AU - Beale,Camilla, AU - Yücel,Murat, AU - Solowij,Nadia, Y1 - 2015/12/08/ PY - 2015/04/02/received PY - 2015/11/11/revised PY - 2015/12/01/accepted PY - 2016/2/10/entrez PY - 2016/2/10/pubmed PY - 2016/11/1/medline KW - Attention KW - Brain KW - Cannabis KW - Cognition KW - Executive function KW - Memory SP - 557 EP - 67 JF - Biological psychiatry JO - Biol. Psychiatry VL - 79 IS - 7 N2 - Cannabis use has been associated with impaired cognition during acute intoxication as well as in the unintoxicated state in long-term users. However, the evidence has been mixed and contested, and no systematic reviews of the literature on neuropsychological task-based measures of cognition have been conducted in an attempt to synthesize the findings. We systematically review the empirical research published in the past decade (from January 2004 to February 2015) on acute and chronic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids and on persistence or recovery after abstinence. We summarize the findings into the major categories of the cognitive domains investigated, considering sample characteristics and associations with various cannabis use parameters. Verbal learning and memory and attention are most consistently impaired by acute and chronic exposure to cannabis. Psychomotor function is most affected during acute intoxication, with some evidence for persistence in chronic users and after cessation of use. Impaired verbal memory, attention, and some executive functions may persist after prolonged abstinence, but persistence or recovery across all cognitive domains remains underresearched. Associations between poorer performance and a range of cannabis use parameters, including a younger age of onset, are frequently reported. Little further evidence has emerged for the development of tolerance to the acutely impairing effects of cannabis. Evidence for potential protection from harmful effects by cannabidiol continues to increase but is not definitive. In light of increasing trends toward legalization of cannabis, the knowledge gained from this body of research needs to be incorporated into strategies to minimize harm. SN - 1873-2402 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26858214/Acute_and_Chronic_Effects_of_Cannabinoids_on_Human_Cognition_A_Systematic_Review_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-3223(15)01037-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -