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Prenatal Arsenic Exposure and Birth Outcomes among a Population Residing near a Mining-Related Superfund Site.
Environ Health Perspect. 2016 08; 124(8):1308-15.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Limited epidemiologic data exist on prenatal arsenic exposure and fetal growth, particularly in the context of co-exposure to other toxic metals.

OBJECTIVE

We examined whether prenatal arsenic exposure predicts birth outcomes among a rural U.S. population, while adjusting for exposure to lead and manganese.

METHODS

We collected maternal and umbilical cord blood samples at delivery from 622 mother-infant pairs residing near a mining-related Superfund site in Northeast Oklahoma. Whole blood arsenic, lead, and manganese were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We modeled associations between arsenic concentrations and birth weight, gestational age, head circumference, and birth weight for gestational age.

RESULTS

Median (25th-75th percentile) maternal and umbilical cord blood metal concentrations, respectively, were as follows: arsenic, 1.4 (1.0-2.3) and 2.4 (1.8-3.3) μg/L; lead, 0.6 (0.4-0.9) and 0.4 (0.3-0.6) μg/dL; manganese, 22.7 (18.8-29.3) and 41.7 (32.2-50.4) μg/L. We estimated negative associations between maternal blood arsenic concentrations and birth outcomes. In multivariable regression models adjusted for lead and manganese, an interquartile range increase in maternal blood arsenic was associated with -77.5 g (95% CI: -127.8, -27.3) birth weight, -0.13 weeks (95% CI: -0.27, 0.01) gestation, -0.22 cm (95% CI: -0.42, -0.03) head circumference, and -0.14 (95% CI: -0.24, -0.04) birth weight for gestational age z-score units. Interactions between arsenic concentrations and lead or manganese were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS

In a population with environmental exposure levels similar to the U.S. general population, maternal blood arsenic was negatively associated with fetal growth. Given the potential for relatively common fetal and early childhood arsenic exposures, our finding that prenatal arsenic can adversely affect birth outcomes is of considerable public health importance.

CITATION

Claus Henn B, Ettinger AS, Hopkins MR, Jim R, Amarasiriwardena C, Christiani DC, Coull BA, Bellinger DC, Wright RO. 2016. Prenatal arsenic exposure and birth outcomes among a population residing near a mining-related Superfund site. Environ Health Perspect 124:1308-1315; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510070.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26859631

Citation

Claus Henn, Birgit, et al. "Prenatal Arsenic Exposure and Birth Outcomes Among a Population Residing Near a Mining-Related Superfund Site." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 124, no. 8, 2016, pp. 1308-15.
Claus Henn B, Ettinger AS, Hopkins MR, et al. Prenatal Arsenic Exposure and Birth Outcomes among a Population Residing near a Mining-Related Superfund Site. Environ Health Perspect. 2016;124(8):1308-15.
Claus Henn, B., Ettinger, A. S., Hopkins, M. R., Jim, R., Amarasiriwardena, C., Christiani, D. C., Coull, B. A., Bellinger, D. C., & Wright, R. O. (2016). Prenatal Arsenic Exposure and Birth Outcomes among a Population Residing near a Mining-Related Superfund Site. Environmental Health Perspectives, 124(8), 1308-15. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510070
Claus Henn B, et al. Prenatal Arsenic Exposure and Birth Outcomes Among a Population Residing Near a Mining-Related Superfund Site. Environ Health Perspect. 2016;124(8):1308-15. PubMed PMID: 26859631.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal Arsenic Exposure and Birth Outcomes among a Population Residing near a Mining-Related Superfund Site. AU - Claus Henn,Birgit, AU - Ettinger,Adrienne S, AU - Hopkins,Marianne R, AU - Jim,Rebecca, AU - Amarasiriwardena,Chitra, AU - Christiani,David C, AU - Coull,Brent A, AU - Bellinger,David C, AU - Wright,Robert O, Y1 - 2016/02/09/ PY - 2015/04/13/received PY - 2015/08/05/revised PY - 2016/01/19/accepted PY - 2016/2/10/entrez PY - 2016/2/10/pubmed PY - 2017/9/22/medline SP - 1308 EP - 15 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ Health Perspect VL - 124 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Limited epidemiologic data exist on prenatal arsenic exposure and fetal growth, particularly in the context of co-exposure to other toxic metals. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether prenatal arsenic exposure predicts birth outcomes among a rural U.S. population, while adjusting for exposure to lead and manganese. METHODS: We collected maternal and umbilical cord blood samples at delivery from 622 mother-infant pairs residing near a mining-related Superfund site in Northeast Oklahoma. Whole blood arsenic, lead, and manganese were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We modeled associations between arsenic concentrations and birth weight, gestational age, head circumference, and birth weight for gestational age. RESULTS: Median (25th-75th percentile) maternal and umbilical cord blood metal concentrations, respectively, were as follows: arsenic, 1.4 (1.0-2.3) and 2.4 (1.8-3.3) μg/L; lead, 0.6 (0.4-0.9) and 0.4 (0.3-0.6) μg/dL; manganese, 22.7 (18.8-29.3) and 41.7 (32.2-50.4) μg/L. We estimated negative associations between maternal blood arsenic concentrations and birth outcomes. In multivariable regression models adjusted for lead and manganese, an interquartile range increase in maternal blood arsenic was associated with -77.5 g (95% CI: -127.8, -27.3) birth weight, -0.13 weeks (95% CI: -0.27, 0.01) gestation, -0.22 cm (95% CI: -0.42, -0.03) head circumference, and -0.14 (95% CI: -0.24, -0.04) birth weight for gestational age z-score units. Interactions between arsenic concentrations and lead or manganese were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: In a population with environmental exposure levels similar to the U.S. general population, maternal blood arsenic was negatively associated with fetal growth. Given the potential for relatively common fetal and early childhood arsenic exposures, our finding that prenatal arsenic can adversely affect birth outcomes is of considerable public health importance. CITATION: Claus Henn B, Ettinger AS, Hopkins MR, Jim R, Amarasiriwardena C, Christiani DC, Coull BA, Bellinger DC, Wright RO. 2016. Prenatal arsenic exposure and birth outcomes among a population residing near a mining-related Superfund site. Environ Health Perspect 124:1308-1315; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510070. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26859631/Prenatal_Arsenic_Exposure_and_Birth_Outcomes_among_a_Population_Residing_near_a_Mining_Related_Superfund_Site_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/ehp.1510070?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -