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Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Knowledge and Attitudes, Preventative Health Behaviors, and Medical Mistrust Among a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Sample of College Women.
J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2015 Mar; 2(1):77-85.JR

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Medical mistrust is associated with disparities in a variety of health outcomes. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has the potential to decrease disparities in cervical cancer by preventing infection with the virus that causes these malignancies. No study has examined associations between medical mistrust and preventative health behaviors including the HPV vaccine among young minority women.

METHODS

Self-reported racial/ethnic minority students completed a web-based survey in fall of 2011. Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis were used to test differences in medical mistrust scores by demographics and health behaviors.

RESULTS

Medical mistrust varied significantly by race with Black women reporting the highest scores. Women with no regular health-care provider (HCP) or who had difficulty talking to their provider had higher mistrust. Higher medical mistrust was associated with a preference to receive HPV vaccine recommendation from a HCP of the same race or ethnicity among unvaccinated women. Black and Asian women who had not received the HPV vaccine had higher mistrust scores than vaccinated women. Perceived difficulty in talking to a HCP was associated with ever having a Pap smear.

DISCUSSION

Awareness of medical mistrust and the influence on health behaviors may aid in increasing delivery of quality health services for racial and ethnic minority populations. Further research among different populations is needed to elucidate impacts of medical mistrust and provider communication on preventative health behaviors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Miami, 1120 NW 14th Street, Room 1521, Miami, FL, 33136, USA. skolar@med.miami.edu.Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA. cwheldon@health.usf.edu.Satcher Health Leadership Institute, Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. nhernandez@msm.edu.STD Control Program, Arizona Department of Health Services, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Lauren.Young@azdhs.gov.Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA. daza@usf.edu.Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA. edaley@health.usf.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26863245

Citation

Kolar, Stephanie K., et al. "Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Knowledge and Attitudes, Preventative Health Behaviors, and Medical Mistrust Among a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Sample of College Women." Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, vol. 2, no. 1, 2015, pp. 77-85.
Kolar SK, Wheldon C, Hernandez ND, et al. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Knowledge and Attitudes, Preventative Health Behaviors, and Medical Mistrust Among a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Sample of College Women. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2015;2(1):77-85.
Kolar, S. K., Wheldon, C., Hernandez, N. D., Young, L., Romero-Daza, N., & Daley, E. M. (2015). Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Knowledge and Attitudes, Preventative Health Behaviors, and Medical Mistrust Among a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Sample of College Women. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 2(1), 77-85. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-014-0050-2
Kolar SK, et al. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Knowledge and Attitudes, Preventative Health Behaviors, and Medical Mistrust Among a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Sample of College Women. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2015;2(1):77-85. PubMed PMID: 26863245.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Knowledge and Attitudes, Preventative Health Behaviors, and Medical Mistrust Among a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Sample of College Women. AU - Kolar,Stephanie K, AU - Wheldon,Christopher, AU - Hernandez,Natalie D, AU - Young,Lauren, AU - Romero-Daza,Nancy, AU - Daley,Ellen M, Y1 - 2014/09/11/ PY - 2014/04/07/received PY - 2014/08/22/accepted PY - 2014/07/01/revised PY - 2016/2/11/entrez PY - 2016/2/11/pubmed PY - 2016/10/19/medline KW - HPV KW - Medical mistrust KW - Preventative KW - Provider communication KW - STI SP - 77 EP - 85 JF - Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities JO - J Racial Ethn Health Disparities VL - 2 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Medical mistrust is associated with disparities in a variety of health outcomes. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has the potential to decrease disparities in cervical cancer by preventing infection with the virus that causes these malignancies. No study has examined associations between medical mistrust and preventative health behaviors including the HPV vaccine among young minority women. METHODS: Self-reported racial/ethnic minority students completed a web-based survey in fall of 2011. Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis were used to test differences in medical mistrust scores by demographics and health behaviors. RESULTS: Medical mistrust varied significantly by race with Black women reporting the highest scores. Women with no regular health-care provider (HCP) or who had difficulty talking to their provider had higher mistrust. Higher medical mistrust was associated with a preference to receive HPV vaccine recommendation from a HCP of the same race or ethnicity among unvaccinated women. Black and Asian women who had not received the HPV vaccine had higher mistrust scores than vaccinated women. Perceived difficulty in talking to a HCP was associated with ever having a Pap smear. DISCUSSION: Awareness of medical mistrust and the influence on health behaviors may aid in increasing delivery of quality health services for racial and ethnic minority populations. Further research among different populations is needed to elucidate impacts of medical mistrust and provider communication on preventative health behaviors. SN - 2196-8837 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26863245/Human_Papillomavirus_Vaccine_Knowledge_and_Attitudes_Preventative_Health_Behaviors_and_Medical_Mistrust_Among_a_Racially_and_Ethnically_Diverse_Sample_of_College_Women_ L2 - https://antibodies.cancer.gov/detail/CPTC-PTPN6-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -