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Racial and Gender Differences in Dating Violence Victimization and Disordered Eating Among U.S. High Schools.
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2016 08; 25(8):791-800.JW

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In 2013, 1 in every 10 students who dated or went out with someone in the previous 12 months reported some form of dating violence (DV). Only a few studies have evaluated the relationship between DV and disordered eating (DE). This study aims to evaluate gender differences in the association between DV victimization and DE behaviors using a nationally representative sample of high school students in the United States.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Data came from the 2013 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Students who reported dating or going out with anyone in the previous 12 months and responded to DV and DE questions were included (N = 9,677). DV was categorized as physical DV, sexual DV, physical and sexual DV, and none. The outcome, or DE, was determined by questions about unhealthy weight control behaviors. Multiple logistic regression models provided odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Race/ethnicity was an effect modifier; thus, stratified analyses assessed for gender and racial/ethnic differences.

RESULTS

The prevalence of past-year physical DV, sexual DV, both physical and sexual DV, and any DV was 5.4%, 5.4%, 4.7%, and 15.5%, respectively. OR estimates were more robust in males than in females. Victims of physical and sexual DV were significantly more likely to report DE, namely among Hispanic and non-Hispanic White males and all female race/ethnic groups, with the exception of non-Hispanic Black females.

CONCLUSIONS

Findings strengthen support for routine DV screening. Adolescent violence prevention programs should consider risky behaviors, such as DE. Interventions should account for gender and racial/ethnic differences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University , Richmond, Virginia.1 Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University , Richmond, Virginia.1 Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University , Richmond, Virginia. 2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University , Richmond, Virginia. 3 Institute for Women's Health, Virginia Commonwealth University , Richmond, Virginia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26871758

Citation

Cha, Susan, et al. "Racial and Gender Differences in Dating Violence Victimization and Disordered Eating Among U.S. High Schools." Journal of Women's Health (2002), vol. 25, no. 8, 2016, pp. 791-800.
Cha S, Ihongbe TO, Masho SW. Racial and Gender Differences in Dating Violence Victimization and Disordered Eating Among U.S. High Schools. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2016;25(8):791-800.
Cha, S., Ihongbe, T. O., & Masho, S. W. (2016). Racial and Gender Differences in Dating Violence Victimization and Disordered Eating Among U.S. High Schools. Journal of Women's Health (2002), 25(8), 791-800. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2015.5324
Cha S, Ihongbe TO, Masho SW. Racial and Gender Differences in Dating Violence Victimization and Disordered Eating Among U.S. High Schools. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2016;25(8):791-800. PubMed PMID: 26871758.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial and Gender Differences in Dating Violence Victimization and Disordered Eating Among U.S. High Schools. AU - Cha,Susan, AU - Ihongbe,Timothy O, AU - Masho,Saba W, Y1 - 2016/02/12/ PY - 2016/2/13/entrez PY - 2016/2/13/pubmed PY - 2017/9/29/medline SP - 791 EP - 800 JF - Journal of women's health (2002) JO - J Womens Health (Larchmt) VL - 25 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: In 2013, 1 in every 10 students who dated or went out with someone in the previous 12 months reported some form of dating violence (DV). Only a few studies have evaluated the relationship between DV and disordered eating (DE). This study aims to evaluate gender differences in the association between DV victimization and DE behaviors using a nationally representative sample of high school students in the United States. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data came from the 2013 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Students who reported dating or going out with anyone in the previous 12 months and responded to DV and DE questions were included (N = 9,677). DV was categorized as physical DV, sexual DV, physical and sexual DV, and none. The outcome, or DE, was determined by questions about unhealthy weight control behaviors. Multiple logistic regression models provided odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Race/ethnicity was an effect modifier; thus, stratified analyses assessed for gender and racial/ethnic differences. RESULTS: The prevalence of past-year physical DV, sexual DV, both physical and sexual DV, and any DV was 5.4%, 5.4%, 4.7%, and 15.5%, respectively. OR estimates were more robust in males than in females. Victims of physical and sexual DV were significantly more likely to report DE, namely among Hispanic and non-Hispanic White males and all female race/ethnic groups, with the exception of non-Hispanic Black females. CONCLUSIONS: Findings strengthen support for routine DV screening. Adolescent violence prevention programs should consider risky behaviors, such as DE. Interventions should account for gender and racial/ethnic differences. SN - 1931-843X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26871758/Racial_and_Gender_Differences_in_Dating_Violence_Victimization_and_Disordered_Eating_Among_U_S__High_Schools_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/jwh.2015.5324?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -