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Healthy dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer by molecular subtype.
Breast Cancer Res Treat 2016; 155(3):579-88BC

Abstract

We examined associations between dietary quality indices and breast cancer risk by molecular subtype among 100,643 women in the prospective Nurses' Health Study (NHS) cohort, followed from 1984 to 2006. Dietary quality scores for the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), alternate Mediterranean diet (aMED), and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary patterns were calculated from semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires collected every 2-4 years. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were defined according to estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2), cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6), and epidermal growth factor receptor status from immunostained tumor microarrays in combination with histologic grade. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age and breast cancer risk factors, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Competing risk analyses were used to assess heterogeneity by subtype. We did not observe any significant associations between the AHEI or aMED dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer by molecular subtype. However, a significantly reduced risk of HER2-type breast cancer was observed among women in 5th versus 1st quintile of the DASH dietary pattern [n = 134 cases, Q5 vs. Q1 HR (95 % CI) = 0.44 (0.25-0.77)], and the inverse trend across quintiles was significant (p trend = 0.02). We did not observe any heterogeneity in associations between AHEI (p het = 0.25), aMED (p het = 0.71), and DASH (p het = 0.12) dietary patterns and breast cancer by subtype. Adherence to the AHEI, aMED, and DASH dietary patterns was not strongly associated with breast cancer molecular subtypes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University, 909 Fee Road, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA. khirko@epi.msu.edu.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 909 Fee Road, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 909 Fee Road, Boston, MA, USA. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 909 Fee Road, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 909 Fee Road, Boston, MA, USA. Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 909 Fee Road, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 909 Fee Road, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 909 Fee Road, Boston, MA, USA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 909 Fee Road, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 909 Fee Road, Boston, MA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26872903

Citation

Hirko, Kelly A., et al. "Healthy Dietary Patterns and Risk of Breast Cancer By Molecular Subtype." Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, vol. 155, no. 3, 2016, pp. 579-88.
Hirko KA, Willett WC, Hankinson SE, et al. Healthy dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer by molecular subtype. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2016;155(3):579-88.
Hirko, K. A., Willett, W. C., Hankinson, S. E., Rosner, B. A., Beck, A. H., Tamimi, R. M., & Eliassen, A. H. (2016). Healthy dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer by molecular subtype. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 155(3), pp. 579-88. doi:10.1007/s10549-016-3706-2.
Hirko KA, et al. Healthy Dietary Patterns and Risk of Breast Cancer By Molecular Subtype. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2016;155(3):579-88. PubMed PMID: 26872903.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Healthy dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer by molecular subtype. AU - Hirko,Kelly A, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Rosner,Bernard A, AU - Beck,Andrew H, AU - Tamimi,Rulla M, AU - Eliassen,A Heather, Y1 - 2016/02/12/ PY - 2016/02/03/received PY - 2016/02/05/accepted PY - 2016/2/14/entrez PY - 2016/2/14/pubmed PY - 2016/11/15/medline KW - Breast cancer KW - Diet KW - Molecular subtypes KW - Patterns SP - 579 EP - 88 JF - Breast cancer research and treatment JO - Breast Cancer Res. Treat. VL - 155 IS - 3 N2 - We examined associations between dietary quality indices and breast cancer risk by molecular subtype among 100,643 women in the prospective Nurses' Health Study (NHS) cohort, followed from 1984 to 2006. Dietary quality scores for the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), alternate Mediterranean diet (aMED), and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary patterns were calculated from semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires collected every 2-4 years. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were defined according to estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2), cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6), and epidermal growth factor receptor status from immunostained tumor microarrays in combination with histologic grade. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age and breast cancer risk factors, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Competing risk analyses were used to assess heterogeneity by subtype. We did not observe any significant associations between the AHEI or aMED dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer by molecular subtype. However, a significantly reduced risk of HER2-type breast cancer was observed among women in 5th versus 1st quintile of the DASH dietary pattern [n = 134 cases, Q5 vs. Q1 HR (95 % CI) = 0.44 (0.25-0.77)], and the inverse trend across quintiles was significant (p trend = 0.02). We did not observe any heterogeneity in associations between AHEI (p het = 0.25), aMED (p het = 0.71), and DASH (p het = 0.12) dietary patterns and breast cancer by subtype. Adherence to the AHEI, aMED, and DASH dietary patterns was not strongly associated with breast cancer molecular subtypes. SN - 1573-7217 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26872903/Healthy_dietary_patterns_and_risk_of_breast_cancer_by_molecular_subtype_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-016-3706-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -