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Parental Acculturative Stressors and Adolescent Adjustment Through Interparental and Parent-Child Relationships in Chinese American Families.
J Youth Adolesc. 2016 Jul; 45(7):1466-81.JY

Abstract

Perpetual foreigner stereotype and bicultural management difficulty are two understudied acculturative stressors frequently experienced by Asian Americans. This study expanded the family stress model to examine how parental experiences of these two acculturative stressors relate to measures of adolescent adjustment (depressive symptoms, delinquent behaviors, and academic performance) during high school and emerging adulthood through interparental and parent-child relationship processes. Participants were 350 Chinese American adolescents (M age = 17.04, 58 % female) and their parents in Northern California. Path models showed that parental acculturative stressors positively related to parent-child conflict, either directly (for both mother-adolescent and father-adolescent dyads) or indirectly through interparental conflict (for mother-adolescent dyads only). Subsequently, both interparental and parent-child conflict positively related to a sense of alienation between parents and adolescents, which then related to more depressive symptoms, more delinquent behaviors, and lower academic performance in adolescents, for mother-adolescent and father-adolescent dyads. These effects persisted from high school to emerging adulthood. The results highlight the indirect effects of maternal and paternal acculturative stressors on adolescent adjustment through family processes involving interparental and parent-child relationships.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, 108 East Dean Keeton St., Stop A2702, Austin, TX, 78712-1248, USA. houyang223@gmail.com.Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, 108 East Dean Keeton St., Stop A2702, Austin, TX, 78712-1248, USA.Department of psychology, Fordham University, Dealy 235, 441 East Fordham Road, New York, NY, 10458-999, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26885827

Citation

Hou, Yang, et al. "Parental Acculturative Stressors and Adolescent Adjustment Through Interparental and Parent-Child Relationships in Chinese American Families." Journal of Youth and Adolescence, vol. 45, no. 7, 2016, pp. 1466-81.
Hou Y, Kim SY, Wang Y. Parental Acculturative Stressors and Adolescent Adjustment Through Interparental and Parent-Child Relationships in Chinese American Families. J Youth Adolesc. 2016;45(7):1466-81.
Hou, Y., Kim, S. Y., & Wang, Y. (2016). Parental Acculturative Stressors and Adolescent Adjustment Through Interparental and Parent-Child Relationships in Chinese American Families. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45(7), 1466-81. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0441-2
Hou Y, Kim SY, Wang Y. Parental Acculturative Stressors and Adolescent Adjustment Through Interparental and Parent-Child Relationships in Chinese American Families. J Youth Adolesc. 2016;45(7):1466-81. PubMed PMID: 26885827.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parental Acculturative Stressors and Adolescent Adjustment Through Interparental and Parent-Child Relationships in Chinese American Families. AU - Hou,Yang, AU - Kim,Su Yeong, AU - Wang,Yijie, Y1 - 2016/02/17/ PY - 2016/01/01/received PY - 2016/02/10/accepted PY - 2016/2/18/entrez PY - 2016/2/18/pubmed PY - 2018/1/13/medline KW - Acculturative stress KW - Adolescent adjustment KW - Chinese American KW - Interparental relationship KW - Parent–child relationship SP - 1466 EP - 81 JF - Journal of youth and adolescence JO - J Youth Adolesc VL - 45 IS - 7 N2 - Perpetual foreigner stereotype and bicultural management difficulty are two understudied acculturative stressors frequently experienced by Asian Americans. This study expanded the family stress model to examine how parental experiences of these two acculturative stressors relate to measures of adolescent adjustment (depressive symptoms, delinquent behaviors, and academic performance) during high school and emerging adulthood through interparental and parent-child relationship processes. Participants were 350 Chinese American adolescents (M age = 17.04, 58 % female) and their parents in Northern California. Path models showed that parental acculturative stressors positively related to parent-child conflict, either directly (for both mother-adolescent and father-adolescent dyads) or indirectly through interparental conflict (for mother-adolescent dyads only). Subsequently, both interparental and parent-child conflict positively related to a sense of alienation between parents and adolescents, which then related to more depressive symptoms, more delinquent behaviors, and lower academic performance in adolescents, for mother-adolescent and father-adolescent dyads. These effects persisted from high school to emerging adulthood. The results highlight the indirect effects of maternal and paternal acculturative stressors on adolescent adjustment through family processes involving interparental and parent-child relationships. SN - 1573-6601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26885827/Parental_Acculturative_Stressors_and_Adolescent_Adjustment_Through_Interparental_and_Parent_Child_Relationships_in_Chinese_American_Families_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0441-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -