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Who's misbehaving? Perceptions of unprofessional social media use by medical students and faculty.
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Feb 18; 16:67.BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Social media use by physicians offers potential benefits but may also be associated with professionalism problems. The objectives of this study were: 1) to examine and compare characteristics of social media use by medical students and faculty; 2) to explore the scope of self- and peer-posting of unprofessional online content; and 3) to determine what actions were taken when unprofessional content was viewed.

METHODS

An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to medical students and faculty in October, 2013 at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York.

RESULTS

Three-quarters of medical students reported using social media "very frequently" (several times a day), whereas less than one-third of faculty did so (p < .001). Medical students reported using privacy settings more often than faculty (96.5 % v. 78.1 %, p < .001). Most medical students (94.2 %) and faculty (94.1 %) reported "never" or "occasionally" monitoring their online presence (p = 0.94). Medical students reported self-posting of profanity, depiction of intoxication, and sexually suggestive material more often than faculty (p < .001). Medical students and faculty both reported peer-posting of unprofessional content significantly more often than self-posting. There was no association between year of medical school and posting of unprofessional content.

CONCLUSION

Medical students reported spending more time using social media and posting unprofessional content more often than did faculty.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. elizabeth.kitsis@einstein.yu.edu. Epidemiology & Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. elizabeth.kitsis@einstein.yu.edu.Departments of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.Epidemiology & Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.Family & Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.Family & Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.Family & Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.Departments of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26887561

Citation

Kitsis, Elizabeth A., et al. "Who's Misbehaving? Perceptions of Unprofessional Social Media Use By Medical Students and Faculty." BMC Medical Education, vol. 16, 2016, p. 67.
Kitsis EA, Milan FB, Cohen HW, et al. Who's misbehaving? Perceptions of unprofessional social media use by medical students and faculty. BMC Med Educ. 2016;16:67.
Kitsis, E. A., Milan, F. B., Cohen, H. W., Myers, D., Herron, P., McEvoy, M., Weingarten, J., & Grayson, M. S. (2016). Who's misbehaving? Perceptions of unprofessional social media use by medical students and faculty. BMC Medical Education, 16, 67. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12909-016-0572-x
Kitsis EA, et al. Who's Misbehaving? Perceptions of Unprofessional Social Media Use By Medical Students and Faculty. BMC Med Educ. 2016 Feb 18;16:67. PubMed PMID: 26887561.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Who's misbehaving? Perceptions of unprofessional social media use by medical students and faculty. AU - Kitsis,Elizabeth A, AU - Milan,Felise B, AU - Cohen,Hillel W, AU - Myers,Daniel, AU - Herron,Patrick, AU - McEvoy,Mimi, AU - Weingarten,Jacqueline, AU - Grayson,Martha S, Y1 - 2016/02/18/ PY - 2015/05/16/received PY - 2016/02/02/accepted PY - 2016/2/19/entrez PY - 2016/2/19/pubmed PY - 2016/12/17/medline SP - 67 EP - 67 JF - BMC medical education JO - BMC Med Educ VL - 16 N2 - BACKGROUND: Social media use by physicians offers potential benefits but may also be associated with professionalism problems. The objectives of this study were: 1) to examine and compare characteristics of social media use by medical students and faculty; 2) to explore the scope of self- and peer-posting of unprofessional online content; and 3) to determine what actions were taken when unprofessional content was viewed. METHODS: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to medical students and faculty in October, 2013 at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. RESULTS: Three-quarters of medical students reported using social media "very frequently" (several times a day), whereas less than one-third of faculty did so (p < .001). Medical students reported using privacy settings more often than faculty (96.5 % v. 78.1 %, p < .001). Most medical students (94.2 %) and faculty (94.1 %) reported "never" or "occasionally" monitoring their online presence (p = 0.94). Medical students reported self-posting of profanity, depiction of intoxication, and sexually suggestive material more often than faculty (p < .001). Medical students and faculty both reported peer-posting of unprofessional content significantly more often than self-posting. There was no association between year of medical school and posting of unprofessional content. CONCLUSION: Medical students reported spending more time using social media and posting unprofessional content more often than did faculty. SN - 1472-6920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26887561/Who's_misbehaving_Perceptions_of_unprofessional_social_media_use_by_medical_students_and_faculty_ L2 - https://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909-016-0572-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -