Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Intimate partner violence-related experiences and mental health among college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan.
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2016 May; 62(3):262-70.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health threat that contributes to a wide range of mental and physical health problems for victims.

AIMS

The purpose of this study was to examine IPV-related experiences and mental health outcomes among college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan.

METHODS

The data were obtained from the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), the International Dating Violence Study (IDVS) 2001-2006 (ICPSR 29583; N = 981; Japan n = 207; Singapore n = 260; South Korea n = 256; Taiwan n = 258).

RESULTS

Co-experience of physical IPV victimization and perpetration was associated with borderline personality traits and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but not with depression. Childhood sexual abuse, gender hostility and violence socialization were significant predictors of borderline personality traits, depression and PTSD. While country and gender variations in mental health are noted, there are two specific populations that may need special attention for mental health interventions: Taiwanese women especially for borderline personality traits and PTSD, and Japanese men especially for depression.

CONCLUSION

IPV victimization and perpetration, childhood sexual abuse, gender hostility and violence socialization have a significant impact on the mental health of college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. Since IPV and mental health are significant public health issues, research on IPV and mental health consequences of IPV victimization and perpetration in these countries should be further expanded in order to better understand the interventions that will be effective in treating victims, perpetrators and victim/perpetrators of IPV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sociology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA akiko.kamimura@utah.edu.School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.Health Society and Policy Program, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26888967

Citation

Kamimura, Akiko, et al. "Intimate Partner Violence-related Experiences and Mental Health Among College Students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan." The International Journal of Social Psychiatry, vol. 62, no. 3, 2016, pp. 262-70.
Kamimura A, Nourian MM, Assasnik N, et al. Intimate partner violence-related experiences and mental health among college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2016;62(3):262-70.
Kamimura, A., Nourian, M. M., Assasnik, N., & Franchek-Roa, K. (2016). Intimate partner violence-related experiences and mental health among college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. The International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 62(3), 262-70. https://doi.org/10.1177/0020764016629700
Kamimura A, et al. Intimate Partner Violence-related Experiences and Mental Health Among College Students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2016;62(3):262-70. PubMed PMID: 26888967.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intimate partner violence-related experiences and mental health among college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. AU - Kamimura,Akiko, AU - Nourian,Maziar M, AU - Assasnik,Nushean, AU - Franchek-Roa,Kathy, Y1 - 2016/02/17/ PY - 2016/2/19/entrez PY - 2016/2/19/pubmed PY - 2017/1/11/medline KW - Asia KW - Depression KW - borderline personality disorder KW - college students KW - intimate partner violence KW - posttraumatic stress disorders SP - 262 EP - 70 JF - The International journal of social psychiatry JO - Int J Soc Psychiatry VL - 62 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health threat that contributes to a wide range of mental and physical health problems for victims. AIMS: The purpose of this study was to examine IPV-related experiences and mental health outcomes among college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. METHODS: The data were obtained from the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), the International Dating Violence Study (IDVS) 2001-2006 (ICPSR 29583; N = 981; Japan n = 207; Singapore n = 260; South Korea n = 256; Taiwan n = 258). RESULTS: Co-experience of physical IPV victimization and perpetration was associated with borderline personality traits and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but not with depression. Childhood sexual abuse, gender hostility and violence socialization were significant predictors of borderline personality traits, depression and PTSD. While country and gender variations in mental health are noted, there are two specific populations that may need special attention for mental health interventions: Taiwanese women especially for borderline personality traits and PTSD, and Japanese men especially for depression. CONCLUSION: IPV victimization and perpetration, childhood sexual abuse, gender hostility and violence socialization have a significant impact on the mental health of college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. Since IPV and mental health are significant public health issues, research on IPV and mental health consequences of IPV victimization and perpetration in these countries should be further expanded in order to better understand the interventions that will be effective in treating victims, perpetrators and victim/perpetrators of IPV. SN - 1741-2854 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26888967/Intimate_partner_violence_related_experiences_and_mental_health_among_college_students_in_Japan_Singapore_South_Korea_and_Taiwan_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0020764016629700?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -