Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Surgical Management of Charcot Deformity for the Foot and Ankle-Radiologic Outcome After Internal/External Fixation.
J Foot Ankle Surg. 2016 May-Jun; 55(3):522-8.JF

Abstract

Charcot neuropathy (CN) is a severe joint disease that makes surgical planning very challenging, because it is combined with ankle instability, serious deformities, and recurrent ulceration. The aim of the present study was to examine the rate of bone fusion after external or internal fixation in patients with CN. We retrospectively examined 58 patients with CN who had undergone reconstruction of the ankle either with tibiotalocalcaneal or tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis. The mean age was 59.1 (range 26 to 81) years at surgery. Of the 58 patients, 38 were treated using intramedullary nail arthrodesis and 19 using an external fixator (1 patient received neither). At a mean follow-up period of 31.3 (range 12 to 57) months, limb salvage and bone fusion had been achieved in 94.83%. The mean time to bone fusion was 12 (range 6 to 18) months. Three patients (5.2%) required a more proximal amputation. All but these 3 patients gained independent mobilization in custom feet orthoses or off the shelf orthoses. Of the 58 patients in the present cohort, 56 (96.6%) would undergo surgery again. In conclusion, internal and external fixation both lead to promising results in the treatment of CN. Internal fixation should be preferred when no indications of ulcer or infection are present.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. Electronic address: sarah@ettinger.info.Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26898396

Citation

Ettinger, Sarah, et al. "Surgical Management of Charcot Deformity for the Foot and Ankle-Radiologic Outcome After Internal/External Fixation." The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery : Official Publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, vol. 55, no. 3, 2016, pp. 522-8.
Ettinger S, Plaass C, Claassen L, et al. Surgical Management of Charcot Deformity for the Foot and Ankle-Radiologic Outcome After Internal/External Fixation. J Foot Ankle Surg. 2016;55(3):522-8.
Ettinger, S., Plaass, C., Claassen, L., Stukenborg-Colsman, C., Yao, D., & Daniilidis, K. (2016). Surgical Management of Charcot Deformity for the Foot and Ankle-Radiologic Outcome After Internal/External Fixation. The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery : Official Publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, 55(3), 522-8. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.jfas.2015.12.008
Ettinger S, et al. Surgical Management of Charcot Deformity for the Foot and Ankle-Radiologic Outcome After Internal/External Fixation. J Foot Ankle Surg. 2016 May-Jun;55(3):522-8. PubMed PMID: 26898396.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Surgical Management of Charcot Deformity for the Foot and Ankle-Radiologic Outcome After Internal/External Fixation. AU - Ettinger,Sarah, AU - Plaass,Christian, AU - Claassen,Leif, AU - Stukenborg-Colsman,Christina, AU - Yao,Daiwei, AU - Daniilidis,Kiriakos, Y1 - 2016/02/19/ PY - 2015/05/26/received PY - 2016/2/23/entrez PY - 2016/2/24/pubmed PY - 2017/6/14/medline KW - Charcot KW - ankle deformity KW - arthrodesis KW - diabetes KW - limb salvage SP - 522 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of foot and ankle surgery : official publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons JO - J Foot Ankle Surg VL - 55 IS - 3 N2 - Charcot neuropathy (CN) is a severe joint disease that makes surgical planning very challenging, because it is combined with ankle instability, serious deformities, and recurrent ulceration. The aim of the present study was to examine the rate of bone fusion after external or internal fixation in patients with CN. We retrospectively examined 58 patients with CN who had undergone reconstruction of the ankle either with tibiotalocalcaneal or tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis. The mean age was 59.1 (range 26 to 81) years at surgery. Of the 58 patients, 38 were treated using intramedullary nail arthrodesis and 19 using an external fixator (1 patient received neither). At a mean follow-up period of 31.3 (range 12 to 57) months, limb salvage and bone fusion had been achieved in 94.83%. The mean time to bone fusion was 12 (range 6 to 18) months. Three patients (5.2%) required a more proximal amputation. All but these 3 patients gained independent mobilization in custom feet orthoses or off the shelf orthoses. Of the 58 patients in the present cohort, 56 (96.6%) would undergo surgery again. In conclusion, internal and external fixation both lead to promising results in the treatment of CN. Internal fixation should be preferred when no indications of ulcer or infection are present. SN - 1542-2224 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26898396/Surgical_Management_of_Charcot_Deformity_for_the_Foot_and_Ankle_Radiologic_Outcome_After_Internal/External_Fixation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1067-2516(15)00580-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -