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The roasting process does not influence the extent of conjugation of coffee chlorogenic and phenolic acids.
Biofactors. 2016 May; 42(3):259-67.B

Abstract

Understanding the bioavailability and metabolism of coffee compounds will contribute to identify the unknown biological mechanism(s) linked to their beneficial effects. The influence of the roasting process on the metabolism of coffee chlorogenic acids in humans was evaluated. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, 12 healthy volunteers consumed four instant coffees namely, high roasted coffee (HRC), low roasted coffee (LRC), unroasted coffee (URC), and in vitro hydrolyzed unroasted coffee (HURC). The sum of areas under the curve (AUC) ranged from 8.65-17.6 to 30.9-126 µM/h (P < 0.05) for HRC, LRC, URC, and HURC, respectively. The AUC of HRC, LRC, and URC was correlated with the initial level of phenolic acids in the coffee drinks. Despite different absorption rates, the extent of conjugation was comparable between HRC, LRC, and URC coffees but different for HURC. The most abundant circulating metabolites during the first 5 H were dihydroferulic acid (DHFA), caffeic acid-3'-O-sulfate (CA3S) and isoferulic-3'-O-glucuronide (iFA3G). DHFA and 5-4-dihydro-m-coumaric acid (mDHCoA) were the main metabolites in the period of 5-24 H. The phenolic compounds after consumption of HURC were most rapidly absorbed (Tmax 1 H) compared with the other coffees (Tmax between 9 and 11 H). Using coffees with different degrees of roasting we highlighted that in spite of different absorption rates the extent of conjugation of phenolic acids was comparable. In addition, by using a hydrolyzed unroasted coffee we demonstrated an increased absorption of phenolic acids in the small intestine. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(3):259-267, 2016.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nestlé Research Center, Nestec Ltd., Vers-Chez-les-Blanc, Lausanne, Switzerland.Nestlé Research Center, Nestec Ltd., Vers-Chez-les-Blanc, Lausanne, Switzerland.Nestlé Research Center, Nestec Ltd., Vers-Chez-les-Blanc, Lausanne, Switzerland.Nestlé Research Center, Nestec Ltd., Vers-Chez-les-Blanc, Lausanne, Switzerland.Nestlé Research Center, Nestec Ltd., Vers-Chez-les-Blanc, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26899568

Citation

Sanchez-Bridge, Belén, et al. "The Roasting Process Does Not Influence the Extent of Conjugation of Coffee Chlorogenic and Phenolic Acids." BioFactors (Oxford, England), vol. 42, no. 3, 2016, pp. 259-67.
Sanchez-Bridge B, Renouf M, Sauser J, et al. The roasting process does not influence the extent of conjugation of coffee chlorogenic and phenolic acids. Biofactors. 2016;42(3):259-67.
Sanchez-Bridge, B., Renouf, M., Sauser, J., Beaumont, M., & Actis-Goretta, L. (2016). The roasting process does not influence the extent of conjugation of coffee chlorogenic and phenolic acids. BioFactors (Oxford, England), 42(3), 259-67. https://doi.org/10.1002/biof.1268
Sanchez-Bridge B, et al. The Roasting Process Does Not Influence the Extent of Conjugation of Coffee Chlorogenic and Phenolic Acids. Biofactors. 2016;42(3):259-67. PubMed PMID: 26899568.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The roasting process does not influence the extent of conjugation of coffee chlorogenic and phenolic acids. AU - Sanchez-Bridge,Belén, AU - Renouf,Mathieu, AU - Sauser,Julien, AU - Beaumont,Maurice, AU - Actis-Goretta,Lucas, Y1 - 2016/02/22/ PY - 2015/10/12/received PY - 2016/01/07/accepted PY - 2016/2/23/entrez PY - 2016/2/24/pubmed PY - 2017/1/24/medline KW - bioavailability KW - coffee KW - human KW - metabolism KW - phenolic acids KW - roasting SP - 259 EP - 67 JF - BioFactors (Oxford, England) JO - Biofactors VL - 42 IS - 3 N2 - Understanding the bioavailability and metabolism of coffee compounds will contribute to identify the unknown biological mechanism(s) linked to their beneficial effects. The influence of the roasting process on the metabolism of coffee chlorogenic acids in humans was evaluated. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, 12 healthy volunteers consumed four instant coffees namely, high roasted coffee (HRC), low roasted coffee (LRC), unroasted coffee (URC), and in vitro hydrolyzed unroasted coffee (HURC). The sum of areas under the curve (AUC) ranged from 8.65-17.6 to 30.9-126 µM/h (P < 0.05) for HRC, LRC, URC, and HURC, respectively. The AUC of HRC, LRC, and URC was correlated with the initial level of phenolic acids in the coffee drinks. Despite different absorption rates, the extent of conjugation was comparable between HRC, LRC, and URC coffees but different for HURC. The most abundant circulating metabolites during the first 5 H were dihydroferulic acid (DHFA), caffeic acid-3'-O-sulfate (CA3S) and isoferulic-3'-O-glucuronide (iFA3G). DHFA and 5-4-dihydro-m-coumaric acid (mDHCoA) were the main metabolites in the period of 5-24 H. The phenolic compounds after consumption of HURC were most rapidly absorbed (Tmax 1 H) compared with the other coffees (Tmax between 9 and 11 H). Using coffees with different degrees of roasting we highlighted that in spite of different absorption rates the extent of conjugation of phenolic acids was comparable. In addition, by using a hydrolyzed unroasted coffee we demonstrated an increased absorption of phenolic acids in the small intestine. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(3):259-267, 2016. SN - 1872-8081 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26899568/The_roasting_process_does_not_influence_the_extent_of_conjugation_of_coffee_chlorogenic_and_phenolic_acids_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/biof.1268 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -