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38 years of autopsy findings in South African mine workers.
Am J Ind Med. 2016 Apr; 59(4):307-14.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

South African miners have a statutory right to autopsies for occupational lung disease compensation. These autopsies also provide information for research and surveillance.

METHODS

Cardio-respiratory organs are removed where miners die and are examined at the National Institute for Occupational Health. We extracted data from the PATHAUT database and described key demographic, exposure and disease trends (1975-2013).

RESULTS

Of 109,101 autopsies, 72,348 (66.3%) were black, and 34,794 (31.9%) were white miners. Autopsies declined from over 3,000 (1975-1998) to 1,118 in 2013. Most were gold miners (74.0%). 78.6% black and 13.2% white miners died while in employment. Overall proportions of silicosis and pulmonary tuberculosis were 12.0% and 13.0% in black, and 20.5% and 2.4% in white miners, respectively. Disease increased over time.

CONCLUSIONS

High levels of disease persist. Black ex-miners are underrepresented, indicating a need for strategies to improve awareness and provision of autopsy facilities in labor-sending areas.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Division of Pathology, National Institute for Occupational Health, National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa.School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.Division of Pathology, National Institute for Occupational Health, National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa. School of Pathology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Division of Pathology, National Institute for Occupational Health, National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26901656

Citation

Ndlovu, Ntombizodwa, et al. "38 Years of Autopsy Findings in South African Mine Workers." American Journal of Industrial Medicine, vol. 59, no. 4, 2016, pp. 307-14.
Ndlovu N, Nelson G, Vorajee N, et al. 38 years of autopsy findings in South African mine workers. Am J Ind Med. 2016;59(4):307-14.
Ndlovu, N., Nelson, G., Vorajee, N., & Murray, J. (2016). 38 years of autopsy findings in South African mine workers. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 59(4), 307-14. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22574
Ndlovu N, et al. 38 Years of Autopsy Findings in South African Mine Workers. Am J Ind Med. 2016;59(4):307-14. PubMed PMID: 26901656.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - 38 years of autopsy findings in South African mine workers. AU - Ndlovu,Ntombizodwa, AU - Nelson,Gill, AU - Vorajee,Naseema, AU - Murray,Jill, Y1 - 2016/02/22/ PY - 2016/01/13/accepted PY - 2016/2/23/entrez PY - 2016/2/24/pubmed PY - 2016/12/16/medline KW - PATHAUT KW - administrative database KW - occupational lung disease KW - silicosis KW - tuberculosis SP - 307 EP - 14 JF - American journal of industrial medicine JO - Am. J. Ind. Med. VL - 59 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: South African miners have a statutory right to autopsies for occupational lung disease compensation. These autopsies also provide information for research and surveillance. METHODS: Cardio-respiratory organs are removed where miners die and are examined at the National Institute for Occupational Health. We extracted data from the PATHAUT database and described key demographic, exposure and disease trends (1975-2013). RESULTS: Of 109,101 autopsies, 72,348 (66.3%) were black, and 34,794 (31.9%) were white miners. Autopsies declined from over 3,000 (1975-1998) to 1,118 in 2013. Most were gold miners (74.0%). 78.6% black and 13.2% white miners died while in employment. Overall proportions of silicosis and pulmonary tuberculosis were 12.0% and 13.0% in black, and 20.5% and 2.4% in white miners, respectively. Disease increased over time. CONCLUSIONS: High levels of disease persist. Black ex-miners are underrepresented, indicating a need for strategies to improve awareness and provision of autopsy facilities in labor-sending areas. SN - 1097-0274 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26901656/38_years_of_autopsy_findings_in_South_African_mine_workers_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22574 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -