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Risk Factors Associated with Mortality and Increased Drug Costs in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.
Hepatogastroenterology. 2015 Jun; 62(140):907-12.H

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS

To determine risk factors associated with mortality and increased drug costs in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

METHODOLOGY

We retrospectively analyzed data from patients hospitalized with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding between January 2001-December 2011. Demographic and clinical characteristics and drug costs were documented. Univariate analysis determined possible risk factors for mortality. Statistically significant variables were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Multiple linear regression analyzed factors influencing drug costs. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

RESULTS

The study included data from 627 patients. Risk factors associated with increased mortality were age > 60, systolic blood pressure<100 mmHg, lack of endoscopic examination, comorbidities, blood transfusion, and rebleeding. Drug costs were higher in patients with rebleeding, blood transfusion, and prolonged hospital stay.

CONCLUSION

In this patient cohort, re-bleeding rate is 11.20% and mortality is 5.74%. The mortality risk in patients with comorbidities was higher than in patients without comorbidities, and was higher in patients requiring blood transfusion than in patients not requiring transfusion. Rebleeding was associ-ated with mortality. Rebleeding, blood transfusion, and prolonged hospital stay were associated with increased drug costs, whereas bleeding from lesions in the esophagus and duodenum was associated with lower drug costs.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26902026

Citation

Lu, Mingliang, et al. "Risk Factors Associated With Mortality and Increased Drug Costs in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding." Hepato-gastroenterology, vol. 62, no. 140, 2015, pp. 907-12.
Lu M, Sun G, Zhang XL, et al. Risk Factors Associated with Mortality and Increased Drug Costs in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding. Hepatogastroenterology. 2015;62(140):907-12.
Lu, M., Sun, G., Zhang, X. L., Zhang, X. M., Liu, Q. S., Huang, Q. Y., Lau, J. W., & Yang, Y. S. (2015). Risk Factors Associated with Mortality and Increased Drug Costs in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding. Hepato-gastroenterology, 62(140), 907-12.
Lu M, et al. Risk Factors Associated With Mortality and Increased Drug Costs in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding. Hepatogastroenterology. 2015;62(140):907-12. PubMed PMID: 26902026.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk Factors Associated with Mortality and Increased Drug Costs in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding. AU - Lu,Mingliang, AU - Sun,Gang, AU - Zhang,Xiu-li, AU - Zhang,Xiao-mei, AU - Liu,Qing-sen, AU - Huang,Qi-yang, AU - Lau,James W Y, AU - Yang,Yun-sheng, PY - 2016/2/24/entrez PY - 2016/2/24/pubmed PY - 2016/4/22/medline SP - 907 EP - 12 JF - Hepato-gastroenterology JO - Hepatogastroenterology VL - 62 IS - 140 N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: To determine risk factors associated with mortality and increased drug costs in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODOLOGY: We retrospectively analyzed data from patients hospitalized with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding between January 2001-December 2011. Demographic and clinical characteristics and drug costs were documented. Univariate analysis determined possible risk factors for mortality. Statistically significant variables were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Multiple linear regression analyzed factors influencing drug costs. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The study included data from 627 patients. Risk factors associated with increased mortality were age > 60, systolic blood pressure<100 mmHg, lack of endoscopic examination, comorbidities, blood transfusion, and rebleeding. Drug costs were higher in patients with rebleeding, blood transfusion, and prolonged hospital stay. CONCLUSION: In this patient cohort, re-bleeding rate is 11.20% and mortality is 5.74%. The mortality risk in patients with comorbidities was higher than in patients without comorbidities, and was higher in patients requiring blood transfusion than in patients not requiring transfusion. Rebleeding was associ-ated with mortality. Rebleeding, blood transfusion, and prolonged hospital stay were associated with increased drug costs, whereas bleeding from lesions in the esophagus and duodenum was associated with lower drug costs. SN - 0172-6390 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26902026/Risk_Factors_Associated_with_Mortality_and_Increased_Drug_Costs_in_Nonvariceal_Upper_Gastrointestinal_Bleeding_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/gastrointestinalbleeding.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -