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Influence of Alternative Exposure Estimates in the Diesel Exhaust Miners Study: Diesel Exhaust and Lung Cancer.
Risk Anal. 2016 09; 36(9):1803-12.RA

Abstract

The landmark Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) studied the relationship between diesel exhaust exposure (DEE) and lung cancer mortality of workers at eight nonmetal mines who were followed from beginning of dieselization of the mines (1947-1967) through December 31, 1997. The original analyses quantified DEE exposures using exposure to respirable elemental carbon (REC) to represent DEE, and CO as a surrogate for REC. However, this use of CO data, and the CO data themselves, have numerous shortcomings. We developed new estimates of REC exposures using historical data on use of diesel equipment, diesel engine horsepower (HP), mine ventilation rates, and the documented reduction in particulate matter emissions per HP in diesel engines from 1975 through 1995. These new REC estimates were applied in a conditional logistic regression of the DEMS nested case-control data very similar to the one applied in the original DEMS analyses. None of the trend slopes calculated using the new REC estimates were statistically significant (p > 0.05). Moreover, these trend slopes were smaller by roughly factors of five without control for radon exposure and factors of 12 with control for radon exposure compared to those estimated in the original DEMS analyses. Also, the 95% confidence intervals for these trend slopes had only minimal overlap with those for the slopes in the original DEMS analyses. These results underscore the uncertainty in estimates of the potency of diesel exhaust in causing lung cancer based on analysis of the DEMS data due to uncertainty in estimates of exposures to diesel exhaust.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ruston, LA, USA. kennycrump@email.com.Ramboll Environ, Monroe, LA, USA.Toxicology and Risk Analysis, Albuquerque, NM, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26905315

Citation

Crump, Kenny S., et al. "Influence of Alternative Exposure Estimates in the Diesel Exhaust Miners Study: Diesel Exhaust and Lung Cancer." Risk Analysis : an Official Publication of the Society for Risk Analysis, vol. 36, no. 9, 2016, pp. 1803-12.
Crump KS, Van Landingham C, McClellan RO. Influence of Alternative Exposure Estimates in the Diesel Exhaust Miners Study: Diesel Exhaust and Lung Cancer. Risk Anal. 2016;36(9):1803-12.
Crump, K. S., Van Landingham, C., & McClellan, R. O. (2016). Influence of Alternative Exposure Estimates in the Diesel Exhaust Miners Study: Diesel Exhaust and Lung Cancer. Risk Analysis : an Official Publication of the Society for Risk Analysis, 36(9), 1803-12. https://doi.org/10.1111/risa.12556
Crump KS, Van Landingham C, McClellan RO. Influence of Alternative Exposure Estimates in the Diesel Exhaust Miners Study: Diesel Exhaust and Lung Cancer. Risk Anal. 2016;36(9):1803-12. PubMed PMID: 26905315.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of Alternative Exposure Estimates in the Diesel Exhaust Miners Study: Diesel Exhaust and Lung Cancer. AU - Crump,Kenny S, AU - Van Landingham,Cynthia, AU - McClellan,Roger O, Y1 - 2016/02/22/ PY - 2016/2/25/entrez PY - 2016/2/26/pubmed PY - 2018/6/26/medline KW - DEMS study KW - diesel exhaust exposure KW - lung cancer SP - 1803 EP - 12 JF - Risk analysis : an official publication of the Society for Risk Analysis JO - Risk Anal VL - 36 IS - 9 N2 - The landmark Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) studied the relationship between diesel exhaust exposure (DEE) and lung cancer mortality of workers at eight nonmetal mines who were followed from beginning of dieselization of the mines (1947-1967) through December 31, 1997. The original analyses quantified DEE exposures using exposure to respirable elemental carbon (REC) to represent DEE, and CO as a surrogate for REC. However, this use of CO data, and the CO data themselves, have numerous shortcomings. We developed new estimates of REC exposures using historical data on use of diesel equipment, diesel engine horsepower (HP), mine ventilation rates, and the documented reduction in particulate matter emissions per HP in diesel engines from 1975 through 1995. These new REC estimates were applied in a conditional logistic regression of the DEMS nested case-control data very similar to the one applied in the original DEMS analyses. None of the trend slopes calculated using the new REC estimates were statistically significant (p > 0.05). Moreover, these trend slopes were smaller by roughly factors of five without control for radon exposure and factors of 12 with control for radon exposure compared to those estimated in the original DEMS analyses. Also, the 95% confidence intervals for these trend slopes had only minimal overlap with those for the slopes in the original DEMS analyses. These results underscore the uncertainty in estimates of the potency of diesel exhaust in causing lung cancer based on analysis of the DEMS data due to uncertainty in estimates of exposures to diesel exhaust. SN - 1539-6924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26905315/Influence_of_Alternative_Exposure_Estimates_in_the_Diesel_Exhaust_Miners_Study:_Diesel_Exhaust_and_Lung_Cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/risa.12556 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -