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Consumption of dairy foods in relation to impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Maastricht Study.
Br J Nutr. 2016 04; 115(8):1453-61.BJ

Abstract

Observational studies suggest an inverse association between total dairy product intake and diabetes risk. However, there is a lack of information on the relationship of specific dairy products with impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Individuals aged 40-75 years were recruited for the Maastricht Study. All the participants filled out a 253-food item FFQ, covering fifty specific dairy items that captured differences between full-fat, semi-skimmed and skimmed products, as well as fermented and non-fermented products. Glucose metabolism status was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, and participants were informed on their glucose metabolism status after returning the FFQ. Data of 2391 individuals were available to estimate OR (95 % CI) for IGM (n 470) and newly diagnosed (ND) T2DM (n 125), with adjustment for age, sex, BMI, physical activity, smoking status, education, energy intake and intakes of vegetables, fruits, meat and fish. For IGM, fully adjusted analyses revealed inverse associations, with OR comparing the highest with the lowest tertile of intake of 0·73 (95 % CI 0·55, 0·96) for skimmed products and 0·74 (95 % CI 0·54, 0·99) for fermented products. These dairy products were not associated with ND T2DM. In contrast, full-fat products were positively associated with ND T2DM (OR 2·01; 95 % CI 1·16, 3·47), whereas total dairy product intake was inversely associated with ND T2DM (OR 0·50; 95 % CI 0·26, 0·93). In conclusion, individuals with a high consumption of skimmed and fermented products had lower odds of having IGM, and individuals with a high consumption of total dairy products had lower odds of having ND T2DM. High intake of full-fat products was not related to IGM but was positively related to ND T2DM.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Epidemiology,Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.1Department of Epidemiology,Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.1Department of Epidemiology,Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.1Department of Epidemiology,Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.4FrieslandCampina,Amersfoort,PO Box 238,6700 AE,Wageningen,The Netherlands.4FrieslandCampina,Amersfoort,PO Box 238,6700 AE,Wageningen,The Netherlands.2School for Cardiovascular Diseases (CARIM),Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.2School for Cardiovascular Diseases (CARIM),Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.2School for Cardiovascular Diseases (CARIM),Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.6Department of Social Medicine,School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI),Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.2School for Cardiovascular Diseases (CARIM),Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.2School for Cardiovascular Diseases (CARIM),Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.2School for Cardiovascular Diseases (CARIM),Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.1Department of Epidemiology,Maastricht University,PO Box 616,6200 MD,Maastricht,The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26907098

Citation

Eussen, Simone J P M., et al. "Consumption of Dairy Foods in Relation to Impaired Glucose Metabolism and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: the Maastricht Study." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 115, no. 8, 2016, pp. 1453-61.
Eussen SJ, van Dongen MC, Wijckmans N, et al. Consumption of dairy foods in relation to impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Maastricht Study. Br J Nutr. 2016;115(8):1453-61.
Eussen, S. J., van Dongen, M. C., Wijckmans, N., den Biggelaar, L., Oude Elferink, S. J., Singh-Povel, C. M., Schram, M. T., Sep, S. J., van der Kallen, C. J., Koster, A., Schaper, N., Henry, R. M., Stehouwer, C. D., & Dagnelie, P. C. (2016). Consumption of dairy foods in relation to impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Maastricht Study. The British Journal of Nutrition, 115(8), 1453-61. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114516000313
Eussen SJ, et al. Consumption of Dairy Foods in Relation to Impaired Glucose Metabolism and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: the Maastricht Study. Br J Nutr. 2016;115(8):1453-61. PubMed PMID: 26907098.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of dairy foods in relation to impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Maastricht Study. AU - Eussen,Simone J P M, AU - van Dongen,Martien C J M, AU - Wijckmans,Nicole, AU - den Biggelaar,Louise, AU - Oude Elferink,Stefanie J W H, AU - Singh-Povel,Cécile M, AU - Schram,Miranda T, AU - Sep,Simone J S, AU - van der Kallen,Carla J, AU - Koster,Annemarie, AU - Schaper,Nicolaas, AU - Henry,Ronald M A, AU - Stehouwer,Coen D A, AU - Dagnelie,Pieter C, Y1 - 2016/02/24/ PY - 2016/2/25/entrez PY - 2016/2/26/pubmed PY - 2017/5/6/medline KW - Dairy foods KW - FFQ KW - IGM impaired glucose metabolism KW - Impaired glucose metabolism KW - ND newly diagnosed KW - NGM normal glucose metabolism KW - Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus KW - Observational studies KW - T2DM type 2 diabetes mellitus SP - 1453 EP - 61 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 115 IS - 8 N2 - Observational studies suggest an inverse association between total dairy product intake and diabetes risk. However, there is a lack of information on the relationship of specific dairy products with impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Individuals aged 40-75 years were recruited for the Maastricht Study. All the participants filled out a 253-food item FFQ, covering fifty specific dairy items that captured differences between full-fat, semi-skimmed and skimmed products, as well as fermented and non-fermented products. Glucose metabolism status was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, and participants were informed on their glucose metabolism status after returning the FFQ. Data of 2391 individuals were available to estimate OR (95 % CI) for IGM (n 470) and newly diagnosed (ND) T2DM (n 125), with adjustment for age, sex, BMI, physical activity, smoking status, education, energy intake and intakes of vegetables, fruits, meat and fish. For IGM, fully adjusted analyses revealed inverse associations, with OR comparing the highest with the lowest tertile of intake of 0·73 (95 % CI 0·55, 0·96) for skimmed products and 0·74 (95 % CI 0·54, 0·99) for fermented products. These dairy products were not associated with ND T2DM. In contrast, full-fat products were positively associated with ND T2DM (OR 2·01; 95 % CI 1·16, 3·47), whereas total dairy product intake was inversely associated with ND T2DM (OR 0·50; 95 % CI 0·26, 0·93). In conclusion, individuals with a high consumption of skimmed and fermented products had lower odds of having IGM, and individuals with a high consumption of total dairy products had lower odds of having ND T2DM. High intake of full-fat products was not related to IGM but was positively related to ND T2DM. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26907098/Consumption_of_dairy_foods_in_relation_to_impaired_glucose_metabolism_and_type_2_diabetes_mellitus:_the_Maastricht_Study_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114516000313/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -