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Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification.
Nature. 2016 Mar 17; 531(7594):362-5.Nat

Abstract

Approximately one-quarter of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere each year is absorbed by the global oceans, causing measurable declines in surface ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration ([CO3(2-)]), and saturation state of carbonate minerals (Ω). This process, referred to as ocean acidification, represents a major threat to marine ecosystems, in particular marine calcifiers such as oysters, crabs, and corals. Laboratory and field studies have shown that calcification rates of many organisms decrease with declining pH, [CO3(2-)], and Ω. Coral reefs are widely regarded as one of the most vulnerable marine ecosystems to ocean acidification, in part because the very architecture of the ecosystem is reliant on carbonate-secreting organisms. Acidification-induced reductions in calcification are projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale declines in coral, and community, calcification over recent decades, determining the contribution of ocean acidification to these changes is difficult, if not impossible, owing to the confounding effects of other environmental factors such as temperature. Here we quantify the net calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment, and show that, when ocean chemistry is restored closer to pre-industrial conditions, net community calcification increases. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment of a natural coral reef community, we provide evidence that net community calcification is depressed compared with values expected for pre-industrial conditions, indicating that ocean acidification may already be impairing coral reef growth.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA.Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA.Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California, Davis, Bodega Bay, California 94923, USA.Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA.Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA. Stanford Nano Shared Facilities, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA.Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California, Davis, Bodega Bay, California 94923, USA.Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA. Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Bundesstraβe 53, 20146 Hamburg, Germany.Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA. Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA.The Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, The H. Steinitz Marine Biology Laboratory, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Eilat, Israel. The Fredy and Nadine Herrman Institute of Earth Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Jerusalem, Israel.Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA. Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel.Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA.Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA. Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA.Institute for Oceanographic and Limnological Research, Haifa, Israel.School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia.Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA. Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. Department of BioSciences, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005, USA.Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26909578

Citation

Albright, Rebecca, et al. "Reversal of Ocean Acidification Enhances Net Coral Reef Calcification." Nature, vol. 531, no. 7594, 2016, pp. 362-5.
Albright R, Caldeira L, Hosfelt J, et al. Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification. Nature. 2016;531(7594):362-5.
Albright, R., Caldeira, L., Hosfelt, J., Kwiatkowski, L., Maclaren, J. K., Mason, B. M., Nebuchina, Y., Ninokawa, A., Pongratz, J., Ricke, K. L., Rivlin, T., Schneider, K., Sesboüé, M., Shamberger, K., Silverman, J., Wolfe, K., Zhu, K., & Caldeira, K. (2016). Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification. Nature, 531(7594), 362-5. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature17155
Albright R, et al. Reversal of Ocean Acidification Enhances Net Coral Reef Calcification. Nature. 2016 Mar 17;531(7594):362-5. PubMed PMID: 26909578.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification. AU - Albright,Rebecca, AU - Caldeira,Lilian, AU - Hosfelt,Jessica, AU - Kwiatkowski,Lester, AU - Maclaren,Jana K, AU - Mason,Benjamin M, AU - Nebuchina,Yana, AU - Ninokawa,Aaron, AU - Pongratz,Julia, AU - Ricke,Katharine L, AU - Rivlin,Tanya, AU - Schneider,Kenneth, AU - Sesboüé,Marine, AU - Shamberger,Kathryn, AU - Silverman,Jacob, AU - Wolfe,Kennedy, AU - Zhu,Kai, AU - Caldeira,Ken, Y1 - 2016/02/24/ PY - 2015/09/29/received PY - 2016/01/20/accepted PY - 2016/2/25/entrez PY - 2016/2/26/pubmed PY - 2016/4/14/medline SP - 362 EP - 5 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 531 IS - 7594 N2 - Approximately one-quarter of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere each year is absorbed by the global oceans, causing measurable declines in surface ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration ([CO3(2-)]), and saturation state of carbonate minerals (Ω). This process, referred to as ocean acidification, represents a major threat to marine ecosystems, in particular marine calcifiers such as oysters, crabs, and corals. Laboratory and field studies have shown that calcification rates of many organisms decrease with declining pH, [CO3(2-)], and Ω. Coral reefs are widely regarded as one of the most vulnerable marine ecosystems to ocean acidification, in part because the very architecture of the ecosystem is reliant on carbonate-secreting organisms. Acidification-induced reductions in calcification are projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale declines in coral, and community, calcification over recent decades, determining the contribution of ocean acidification to these changes is difficult, if not impossible, owing to the confounding effects of other environmental factors such as temperature. Here we quantify the net calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment, and show that, when ocean chemistry is restored closer to pre-industrial conditions, net community calcification increases. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment of a natural coral reef community, we provide evidence that net community calcification is depressed compared with values expected for pre-industrial conditions, indicating that ocean acidification may already be impairing coral reef growth. SN - 1476-4687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26909578/Reversal_of_ocean_acidification_enhances_net_coral_reef_calcification_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/nature17155 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -