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Consumption of dairy foods and diabetes incidence: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Apr; 103(4):1111-24.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A growing number of cohort studies suggest a potential role of dairy consumption in type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevention. The strength of this association and the amount of dairy needed is not clear.

OBJECTIVE

We performed a meta-analysis to quantify the associations of incident T2D with dairy foods at different levels of intake.

DESIGN

A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Embase databases (from inception to 14 April 2015) was supplemented by hand searches of reference lists and correspondence with authors of prior studies. Included were prospective cohort studies that examined the association between dairy and incident T2D in healthy adults. Data were extracted with the use of a predefined protocol, with double data-entry and study quality assessments. Random-effects meta-analyses with summarized dose-response data were performed for total, low-fat, and high-fat dairy, (types of) milk, (types of) fermented dairy, cream, ice cream, and sherbet. Nonlinear associations were investigated, with data modeled with the use of spline knots and visualized via spaghetti plots.

RESULTS

The analysis included 22 cohort studies comprised of 579,832 individuals and 43,118 T2D cases. Total dairy was inversely associated with T2D risk (RR: 0.97 per 200-g/d increment; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.00;P= 0.04;I(2)= 66%), with a suggestive but similar linear inverse association noted for low-fat dairy (RR: 0.96 per 200 g/d; 95% CI: 0.92, 1.00;P= 0.072;I(2)= 68%). Nonlinear inverse associations were found for yogurt intake (at 80 g/d, RR: 0.86 compared with 0 g/d; 95% CI: 0.83, 0.90;P< 0.001;I(2)= 73%) and ice cream intake (at ∼10 g/d, RR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.85;P< 0.001;I(2)= 86%), but no added incremental benefits were found at a higher intake. Other dairy types were not associated with T2D risk.

CONCLUSION

This dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies suggests a possible role for dairy foods, particularly yogurt, in the prevention of T2D. Results should be considered in the context of the observed heterogeneity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands;Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and Microclinic International, San Francisco, CA.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and.Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands;Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands;Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands; sabita.soedamah-muthu@wur.nl.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26912494

Citation

Gijsbers, Lieke, et al. "Consumption of Dairy Foods and Diabetes Incidence: a Dose-response Meta-analysis of Observational Studies." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 103, no. 4, 2016, pp. 1111-24.
Gijsbers L, Ding EL, Malik VS, et al. Consumption of dairy foods and diabetes incidence: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;103(4):1111-24.
Gijsbers, L., Ding, E. L., Malik, V. S., de Goede, J., Geleijnse, J. M., & Soedamah-Muthu, S. S. (2016). Consumption of dairy foods and diabetes incidence: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 103(4), 1111-24. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.115.123216
Gijsbers L, et al. Consumption of Dairy Foods and Diabetes Incidence: a Dose-response Meta-analysis of Observational Studies. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;103(4):1111-24. PubMed PMID: 26912494.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of dairy foods and diabetes incidence: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies. AU - Gijsbers,Lieke, AU - Ding,Eric L, AU - Malik,Vasanti S, AU - de Goede,Janette, AU - Geleijnse,Johanna M, AU - Soedamah-Muthu,Sabita S, Y1 - 2016/02/24/ PY - 2015/09/08/received PY - 2016/01/07/accepted PY - 2016/2/26/entrez PY - 2016/2/26/pubmed PY - 2016/8/16/medline KW - cheese KW - dairy KW - dose-response associations KW - meta-analysis KW - milk KW - prospective/observational studies KW - type 2 diabetes KW - yogurt SP - 1111 EP - 24 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 103 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: A growing number of cohort studies suggest a potential role of dairy consumption in type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevention. The strength of this association and the amount of dairy needed is not clear. OBJECTIVE: We performed a meta-analysis to quantify the associations of incident T2D with dairy foods at different levels of intake. DESIGN: A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Embase databases (from inception to 14 April 2015) was supplemented by hand searches of reference lists and correspondence with authors of prior studies. Included were prospective cohort studies that examined the association between dairy and incident T2D in healthy adults. Data were extracted with the use of a predefined protocol, with double data-entry and study quality assessments. Random-effects meta-analyses with summarized dose-response data were performed for total, low-fat, and high-fat dairy, (types of) milk, (types of) fermented dairy, cream, ice cream, and sherbet. Nonlinear associations were investigated, with data modeled with the use of spline knots and visualized via spaghetti plots. RESULTS: The analysis included 22 cohort studies comprised of 579,832 individuals and 43,118 T2D cases. Total dairy was inversely associated with T2D risk (RR: 0.97 per 200-g/d increment; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.00;P= 0.04;I(2)= 66%), with a suggestive but similar linear inverse association noted for low-fat dairy (RR: 0.96 per 200 g/d; 95% CI: 0.92, 1.00;P= 0.072;I(2)= 68%). Nonlinear inverse associations were found for yogurt intake (at 80 g/d, RR: 0.86 compared with 0 g/d; 95% CI: 0.83, 0.90;P< 0.001;I(2)= 73%) and ice cream intake (at ∼10 g/d, RR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.85;P< 0.001;I(2)= 86%), but no added incremental benefits were found at a higher intake. Other dairy types were not associated with T2D risk. CONCLUSION: This dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies suggests a possible role for dairy foods, particularly yogurt, in the prevention of T2D. Results should be considered in the context of the observed heterogeneity. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26912494/Consumption_of_dairy_foods_and_diabetes_incidence:_a_dose_response_meta_analysis_of_observational_studies_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.115.123216 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -