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Dairy consumption in association with weight change and risk of becoming overweight or obese in middle-aged and older women: a prospective cohort study.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Apr; 103(4):979-88.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Studies have reported inconsistent findings on the association between dairy product intake and weight change and obesity. Only a few prospective studies have investigated the role of dairy consumption in both weight change and risk of becoming overweight or obese and whether these associations depend on the initial body weight.

OBJECTIVE

We prospectively investigated how dairy product intake was associated with weight change and risk of becoming overweight or obese in initially normal-weight women.

DESIGN

We studied 18,438 women aged ≥45 y from the Women's Health Study who were free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes and had initial body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) from 18.5 to <25 at baseline. Dairy intake was assessed with the use of a 131-item food-frequency questionnaire. Women self-reported body weight along with obesity-related risk factors on baseline and annual follow-up questionnaires. At each follow-up time, women were categorized as normal weight (BMI: 18.5 to <25), overweight (BMI: 25 to <30), or obese (BMI ≥30).

RESULTS

During a mean follow-up of 11.2 y, 8238 women became overweight or obese. Multivariable-adjusted mean ± SD changes in body weight during the follow-up (18 y) were 1.90 ± 0.09, 1.88 ± 0.08, 1.86 ± 0.09, 1.82 ± 0.09, and 1.65 ± 0.09 kg in quintiles 1-5 of total dairy intake, respectively (P-trend = 0.003). Greater intake of high-fat dairy products, but not intake of low-fat dairy products, was associated with less weight gain (P-trend = 0.004). In multivariable-adjusted analyses, lower risk of becoming overweight or obese was observed in the highest quintile of high-fat dairy product intake (HR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.86, 0.99). Dietary or supplemental calcium or vitamin D was not associated with risk of becoming overweight or obese.

CONCLUSION

Greater consumption of total dairy products may be of importance in the prevention of weight gain in middle-aged and elderly women who are initially normal weight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; susanne.rautiainen@ki.se.Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA;Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chang School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and.Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chang School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and.Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chang School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and.Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chang School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26912496

Citation

Rautiainen, Susanne, et al. "Dairy Consumption in Association With Weight Change and Risk of Becoming Overweight or Obese in Middle-aged and Older Women: a Prospective Cohort Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 103, no. 4, 2016, pp. 979-88.
Rautiainen S, Wang L, Lee IM, et al. Dairy consumption in association with weight change and risk of becoming overweight or obese in middle-aged and older women: a prospective cohort study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;103(4):979-88.
Rautiainen, S., Wang, L., Lee, I. M., Manson, J. E., Buring, J. E., & Sesso, H. D. (2016). Dairy consumption in association with weight change and risk of becoming overweight or obese in middle-aged and older women: a prospective cohort study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 103(4), 979-88. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.115.118406
Rautiainen S, et al. Dairy Consumption in Association With Weight Change and Risk of Becoming Overweight or Obese in Middle-aged and Older Women: a Prospective Cohort Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;103(4):979-88. PubMed PMID: 26912496.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy consumption in association with weight change and risk of becoming overweight or obese in middle-aged and older women: a prospective cohort study. AU - Rautiainen,Susanne, AU - Wang,Lu, AU - Lee,I-Min, AU - Manson,JoAnn E, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Sesso,Howard D, Y1 - 2016/02/24/ PY - 2015/06/30/received PY - 2016/01/11/accepted PY - 2016/2/26/entrez PY - 2016/2/26/pubmed PY - 2016/8/16/medline KW - cohort KW - dairy KW - obesity KW - overweight KW - weight SP - 979 EP - 88 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 103 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Studies have reported inconsistent findings on the association between dairy product intake and weight change and obesity. Only a few prospective studies have investigated the role of dairy consumption in both weight change and risk of becoming overweight or obese and whether these associations depend on the initial body weight. OBJECTIVE: We prospectively investigated how dairy product intake was associated with weight change and risk of becoming overweight or obese in initially normal-weight women. DESIGN: We studied 18,438 women aged ≥45 y from the Women's Health Study who were free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes and had initial body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) from 18.5 to <25 at baseline. Dairy intake was assessed with the use of a 131-item food-frequency questionnaire. Women self-reported body weight along with obesity-related risk factors on baseline and annual follow-up questionnaires. At each follow-up time, women were categorized as normal weight (BMI: 18.5 to <25), overweight (BMI: 25 to <30), or obese (BMI ≥30). RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 11.2 y, 8238 women became overweight or obese. Multivariable-adjusted mean ± SD changes in body weight during the follow-up (18 y) were 1.90 ± 0.09, 1.88 ± 0.08, 1.86 ± 0.09, 1.82 ± 0.09, and 1.65 ± 0.09 kg in quintiles 1-5 of total dairy intake, respectively (P-trend = 0.003). Greater intake of high-fat dairy products, but not intake of low-fat dairy products, was associated with less weight gain (P-trend = 0.004). In multivariable-adjusted analyses, lower risk of becoming overweight or obese was observed in the highest quintile of high-fat dairy product intake (HR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.86, 0.99). Dietary or supplemental calcium or vitamin D was not associated with risk of becoming overweight or obese. CONCLUSION: Greater consumption of total dairy products may be of importance in the prevention of weight gain in middle-aged and elderly women who are initially normal weight. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26912496/Dairy_consumption_in_association_with_weight_change_and_risk_of_becoming_overweight_or_obese_in_middle_aged_and_older_women:_a_prospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.115.118406 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -