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Gut bacteria that prevent growth impairments transmitted by microbiota from malnourished children.
Science 2016; 351(6275)Sci

Abstract

Undernourished children exhibit impaired development of their gut microbiota. Transplanting microbiota from 6- and 18-month-old healthy or undernourished Malawian donors into young germ-free mice that were fed a Malawian diet revealed that immature microbiota from undernourished infants and children transmit impaired growth phenotypes. The representation of several age-discriminatory taxa in recipient animals correlated with lean body mass gain; liver, muscle, and brain metabolism; and bone morphology. Mice were cohoused shortly after receiving microbiota from healthy or severely stunted and underweight infants; age- and growth-discriminatory taxa from the microbiota of the former were able to invade that of the latter, which prevented growth impairments in recipient animals. Adding two invasive species, Ruminococcus gnavus and Clostridium symbiosum, to the microbiota from undernourished donors also ameliorated growth and metabolic abnormalities in recipient animals. These results provide evidence that microbiota immaturity is causally related to undernutrition and reveal potential therapeutic targets and agents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology and Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology and Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology and Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology and Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology and Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Centerand Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology and Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. School of Public Health and Family Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Chichiri, Blantyre 3, Malawi.Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Chichiri, Blantyre 3, Malawi.Department of Nutrition and Program in International and Community Nutrition, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.Department for International Health, University of Tampere School of Medicine, Tampere 33014, Finland.Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Aix-Marseille Université, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9, France. Department of Biological Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.A. A. Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 127994, Russia.A. A. Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 127994, Russia. Infectious and Inflammatory Disease Center, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.Infectious and Inflammatory Disease Center, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.School of Public Health and Family Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Chichiri, Blantyre 3, Malawi.Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Centerand Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology and Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.Department for International Health, University of Tampere School of Medicine, Tampere 33014, Finland. Department of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere 33521, Finland.Department of Nutrition and Program in International and Community Nutrition, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology and Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26912898

Citation

Blanton, Laura V., et al. "Gut Bacteria That Prevent Growth Impairments Transmitted By Microbiota From Malnourished Children." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 351, no. 6275, 2016.
Blanton LV, Charbonneau MR, Salih T, et al. Gut bacteria that prevent growth impairments transmitted by microbiota from malnourished children. Science. 2016;351(6275).
Blanton, L. V., Charbonneau, M. R., Salih, T., Barratt, M. J., Venkatesh, S., Ilkaveya, O., ... Gordon, J. I. (2016). Gut bacteria that prevent growth impairments transmitted by microbiota from malnourished children. Science (New York, N.Y.), 351(6275), doi:10.1126/science.aad3311.
Blanton LV, et al. Gut Bacteria That Prevent Growth Impairments Transmitted By Microbiota From Malnourished Children. Science. 2016 Feb 19;351(6275) PubMed PMID: 26912898.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gut bacteria that prevent growth impairments transmitted by microbiota from malnourished children. AU - Blanton,Laura V, AU - Charbonneau,Mark R, AU - Salih,Tarek, AU - Barratt,Michael J, AU - Venkatesh,Siddarth, AU - Ilkaveya,Olga, AU - Subramanian,Sathish, AU - Manary,Mark J, AU - Trehan,Indi, AU - Jorgensen,Josh M, AU - Fan,Yue-Mei, AU - Henrissat,Bernard, AU - Leyn,Semen A, AU - Rodionov,Dmitry A, AU - Osterman,Andrei L, AU - Maleta,Kenneth M, AU - Newgard,Christopher B, AU - Ashorn,Per, AU - Dewey,Kathryn G, AU - Gordon,Jeffrey I, PY - 2016/2/26/entrez PY - 2016/2/26/pubmed PY - 2016/3/11/medline JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 351 IS - 6275 N2 - Undernourished children exhibit impaired development of their gut microbiota. Transplanting microbiota from 6- and 18-month-old healthy or undernourished Malawian donors into young germ-free mice that were fed a Malawian diet revealed that immature microbiota from undernourished infants and children transmit impaired growth phenotypes. The representation of several age-discriminatory taxa in recipient animals correlated with lean body mass gain; liver, muscle, and brain metabolism; and bone morphology. Mice were cohoused shortly after receiving microbiota from healthy or severely stunted and underweight infants; age- and growth-discriminatory taxa from the microbiota of the former were able to invade that of the latter, which prevented growth impairments in recipient animals. Adding two invasive species, Ruminococcus gnavus and Clostridium symbiosum, to the microbiota from undernourished donors also ameliorated growth and metabolic abnormalities in recipient animals. These results provide evidence that microbiota immaturity is causally related to undernutrition and reveal potential therapeutic targets and agents. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26912898/Gut_bacteria_that_prevent_growth_impairments_transmitted_by_microbiota_from_malnourished_children_ L2 - http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=26912898 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -